Intake:

Beds Available: 36
Programs for Men
Options for Adolescents
Young Adult Programs
Children Programs
Smoking Prohibited
Bilingual Therapists

Financials:

Payment Assistance
Daily Fee: $397.00
Private Insurance
Medicaid
State Financial Aid
Financing Available
Self-pay Options

Modality:

Family Counseling:

Family Counseling can be for both the addict and his/her family, or may be solely for family members (without the addict present). Many support groups for family members of addicts see addiction as a family illness, not just the problem of one member of the family (the addict). Numerous research studies also demonstrate that recovery is far more successful and sustainable when loved ones -- especially family members -- participate in rehab and/or substance abuse treatment. Family support groups are also helpful since family members relating with an addict often need support themselves; it's a very stressful thing to deal with. Family support groups allow all members of the family to receive the benefits of treatment, and can include training on how to communicate effectively, establish healthy boundaries, and get support around the stress and trauma of addiction.

Individual Counseling:

In individual Counseling, a client meets one-on-one with a trained therapist or counselor. This kind of psychotherapy and focused attention is a crucial part of treating substance abuse and helping individuals overcome alcohol and drug addiction. Therapy can be instrumental in uncovering the root causes of addiction, such as challenges and struggles a patient has faced in their family, social, and work/school lives. Once these root causes (which often involve past trauma) are identified and worked through, substance abuse is much easier to overcome and sobriety to be reached. Different therapists use different therapeutic modalities, such as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, which has been shown to be effective in stopping addiction while also providing tools for maintaining sobriety.

Group Counseling:

Group Counseling is therapy that includes two or more people and is led by a mental health professional (usually a therapist or a counselor). Group therapy can help participants improve their social skills, talk about their problems with others, and work on their mental health issues. In group therapy, members can provide support for one another in the group. They can also offer advice on how a person in the group can cope with or deal with their problems. Some group therapy sessions focus on helping people suffering from alcoholism or drug addiction. Through group therapy, participants often feel less alone because they know that others struggle with the same issues.

Additional Services:

Psychotropic Medication:

Psychotropic medications (aka psychodynamic medication) are any medicines used specifically to affect and/or alter a patient's mind, emotions, and behaviors. Such psychiatric medicines are often used to change chemical levels in the brain that impact a person's mood and behavior. These medications include mood stabilizers, antidepressants, anti-ADHD drugs, and anti-anxiety medications.

Aftercare Support:

The youth, parent/guardian, community therapist/clinical therapist/coaching parent/life-skills specialist/placing worker/treatment parent/case manager, as appropriate, will be involved in discharge planning. This plan begins with the development of the treatment plan and continues throughout treatment. When indicated, the above mentioned treatment team will participate in the development of a written discharge plan. Discharge planning is an ongoing and collaborative process, and specific designation of responsibility for services after discharge from the facility will be documented throughout the discharge planning process.

Treatment Approach:

Religious Approach:

Religion-based rehab refers to a recovery program that uses a specific religion or religious practice as the basis for treatment. These addiction treatment programs view faith as an important part of recovery and sobriety. Religion-based treatment programs can involve many religions, such as Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, etc. In these programs, counselors and peers use the teachings of a religion to offer support and guidance. Connecting with one's faith can help someone in a religion-based program build a strong foundation for recovery. Faith-based recovery programs can also provide inspiration, comfort, and support in a meaningful way. Some addiction treatment programs, like Alcoholics Anonymous (AA), are not based on the teachings of a specific religion, but do emphasize a spiritual practice and the importance of connecting with a higher power.

Individualized Approach:

Families and youth play an integral role in establishing treatment direction. This process actually starts during pre-admission when intake therapists discuss with the guardian / youth the reason for referral and desired treatment outcomes. An initial plan of care is created that addresses orientation to the program, student rights, safety planning and participation in the therapeutic process. Within fourteen days of admission and based upon a comprehensive assessment, an interdisciplinary team will develop an individualized treatment plan that addresses presenting issues and establishes goals. The treatment team includes the youth, a variety of people who are important in the youth’s life and the AK Child & Family treatment professionals who provide care.

Level of Care:

Inpatient:

The treatment program includes, but is not limited to, the following: individual, group and family therapy on a weekly basis by a Master’s-educated clinical therapist; nursing services by registered nurses with oversight of a medical director; milieu therapy which includes structure activities; individualized treatment work for youth; recreation therapy; voluntary spiritual life activities; and educational support.

Treatment:

Mental Health:

Mental health treatment focuses on helping patients manage and overcome mental illnesses, such as clinical depression, anxiety disorders, eating disorders, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and more. Mental health treatment can include one-on-one talk therapy (traditional psychotherapy), as well as more holistic or alternative modalities such as art therapy, equine therapy, eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR), and more. Group therapy can also prove beneficial in terms of overcoming mental health disorders. At mental health rehab facilities, a team of medical professionals — including doctors, therapists and counselors — are trained to treat many different types of mental health issues, and some also provide treatment for substance abuse and addiction. A therapist or counselor working at these facilities often offers one-on-one therapy to patients and leads group therapy sessions.

Dual Diagnosis:

Dual diagnosis refers to the diagnosis given to a person or patient who struggles with addiction and has also been diagnosed with a mental or emotional illness. To treat someone with a dual diagnosis, rehab centers and other mental health facilities aim to provide comprehensive treatment for both the substance abuse and mental illness. At these facilities, counselors and therapists work with dual-diagnosis patients to help them manage their mental health problems and overcome addiction at the same time. Common co-occurring substance abuse and mental illnesses can include drug addiction or alcoholism alongside clinical depression, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder, and more. In some cases, a mental health illness can lead to an addiction issue, or vice versa: an addiction issue can create a mental health issue. It's important to treat both at the same time whenever possible.

ADHD:

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is generally characterized by the inability to focus; not being able to get or stay organized; being impulsive; and being hyperactive (not being able to sit still). While it's normal to have trouble focusing and paying attention at times, for someone with ADHD, these behaviors are more extreme, occur more frequently, and make it hard to succeed or even function at work and/or at school. In order to be diagnosed with ADHD, a person must be seen by a healthcare professional such as a pediatrician, psychiatrist, or psychologist. Both children and adults can be diagnosed with ADHD. It is common for someone struggling with addiction or substance abuse issues to also struggle with ADHD, especially since many people seek out drugs or alcohol to help manage the symptoms of ADHD.

Anger:

Aggression, anger or violent behavior should not be ignored. Extreme feelings of anger can lead to distress, dysfunction and the inability to cope with one's emotions in a healthy way. A person with anger issues might have a sudden or uncontrollable outburst. Individuals with anger problems might also hold grudges, have trouble taking criticism, or feel like they have to “win” every argument. For someone struggling with addiction, anger issues could cause or worsen their substance abuse problem. Also, a person who is abusing drugs or alcohol could experience more intense feelings of anger.

Anxiety:

An anxiety disorder is the diagnosis for someone who experiences frequent or obsessive anxiety that doesn't go away. Signs of an anxiety disorder include excessive worrying; trouble concentrating; fear of making the wrong decision; and constantly feeling restless or inability to relax. Physical symptoms of an anxiety disorder include fatigue, poor sleep patterns, nervousness, nausea, sweating, and tense muscles. Anxiety disorders are one of the most common mental health issues that occur alongside substance abuse. Many addiction and substance abuse counselors are trained to help patients with a co-occurring anxiety disorder.

Bipolar:

Bipolar Disorder is a mental illness that generates unusual and extreme changes in a person's mood, energy levels and the ability to accomplish daily tasks and think clearly. A person with Bipolar Disorder can experience frequent highs (often referred to as mania or manic episodes) and lows (often referred to as depression or depressive episodes). Someone with Bipolar Disorder might "self-medicate" by using drugs and alcohol to deal with their mental or emotional issues. Substance abuse is more common with Bipolar Disorder than with any other mental health diagnosis. Suicide is a serious risk concern for an individual with Bipolar Disorder.

Depression:

Depression is a serious mood disorder. Signs and symptoms of depression include: fatigue, trouble sleeping, changes in appetite, lack of interest in activities a person used to enjoy, irritability, and suicidal thoughts. A depressed person might feel sad, anxious, or hopeless. Typically, symptoms must persist for at least two weeks before someone is diagnosed with clinical depression. Depression can affect people of all ages, ethnicities and socioeconomic backgrounds. An estimated 30% of people with substance abuse problems suffer from depression.

PTSD and Trauma:

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a mental health disorder that someone can develop after experiencing a traumatic incident, such as a shooting, a natural disaster, a car accident, or sexual assault (i.e. rape or child sexual abuse). Symptoms of PTSD include reliving the event in one's mind; nightmares; avoiding situations that might trigger memories of the event; negative beliefs and feelings; and feeling jittery, angry or irritable. The main types of treatment for PTSD are psychotherapy and medication. Someone suffering from PTSD may experience depression, anxiety and substance abuse problems.

Techniques:

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy:

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a common therapy technique. This type of therapy focuses on the relationship between a person's thoughts, feelings and behaviors. For example, if you know that when you have the thought, "I'm worthless," you want to drink or do drugs, you can then make a new choice in the future when you have that thought (like calling a friend or going for a walk instead). Awareness is critical in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, the ultimate goal of which is to help patients develop healthy responses to their thoughts and feelings. CBT has been proven very helpful for people struggling with alcohol and drug addiction, as well other mental health issues, like eating disorders. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy helps a person become more self-aware and build up their ability to cope with problems in healthier ways. Many therapists, counselors, psychologists, and social workers use Cognitive Behavioral Therapy techniques when working with their patients.

Dialectical Behavior Therapy:

Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) is type of therapy that helps someone understand the relationship between their thoughts, feelings and actions. Once a person understands this relationship, they can work on changing their behaviors and dealing with their problems in healthier ways. Dialectical Behavior Therapy has been proven clinically effective for people struggling with out-of-control emotions and some mental illnesses, like Borderline Personality Disorder. This type of therapy can also be helpful for individuals dealing with self-harm, such as self-mutilation (cutting) or having suicidal thoughts or urges. Dialectical Behavior Therapy often builds on the techniques and tools a patient learned in Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT), one of the most common types of therapy.

Trauma Therapy:

Trauma can be one of the main triggers and causes for addiction. Trauma therapy helps someone deal with a traumatic incident or event from their past. Trauma can stem from childhood sexual abuse; domestic violence; teenage or adult sexual assault; or losing one or both parents at a young age. There are other types of trauma as well, such as having a parent with a mental illness. These traumatic experiences often affect a person's life in the present. For instance, someone who was a victim of childhood sexual abuse often feels intense shame, fear, depression or guilt. Those who have experienced trauma often abuse drugs or alcohol as a way to cope with what happened to them in the past. The goal of trauma therapy is to help a patient process their trauma and move on, with the aid of a trained and compassionate mental health professional.

Experiential Therapy:

Experiential therapy is different from traditional 'talk' therapy. In experiential therapy, a person works through issues by participating in real-life, hands-on experiences. For example, someone struggling with alcoholism or drug addiction might participate in outdoor activities, which is sometimes called wilderness therapy. Experiential therapy can also include creative activities (like music or making art), or having patients role-play a situation or problem by "acting it out" and using props. Many rehab facilities and mental health treatment centers offer some type of experiential therapy, such as: wilderness therapy, equine therapy (working with horses), creative arts therapy, and adventure therapy. Experiential therapy can help someone process trauma, heal from painful memories and experiences, and build new coping and social skills. This type of therapy can also boost a person's self-esteem and prepare them for success in their home life, relationships, social life and careers following treatment.

Life Skills:

Activity therapy is available both individually and in a group setting. Individual activity therapy pairs a child with an adult Activity Therapist (AT) to work on social skills, communication, goal setting, independent living, anger management and other treatment issues. Group Activity Therapy follows a curriculum that introduces youth to a variety of topics and issues that may include self-expression, community resources, initiative taking, vocational training, team building, health and fitness, social skill development and psychotherapy.

Nutrition Therapy:

In treating addiction and other mental health issues, many benefit from a holistic approach, which can include nutritional therapy. Also known as medical nutritional therapy (MNT), nutritional therapy refers to changing one's diet to treat physical or emotional health issues. Nutritional therapy seeks to treat the body as a whole and promote physical, emotional and mental wellbeing. A nutritional therapist — which could refer to a professsional nutritionist or a registered dietitian — helps a person alleviate their health concerns through maintaining a healthy, balanced diet. A nutritional therapist makes diet and lifestyle recommendations, but they do not diagnose medical conditions or treat mental health issues directly. Many rehab facilities and addiction recovery centers offer some form of nutritional therapy.

Amenities:

Private Setting
Residential Setting
Day School Available
Private Rooms
Recreation Room

Accreditations:

JCAHO
Last Updated: 05/30/2018