Overview:

Psychologist:

Many people have a hard time understanding the difference between a psychologist and a psychiatrist. A clinical psychologist has a doctorate degree in psychology and must be licensed by the state in order to diagnose and treat patients. A psychiatrist goes to medical school and specializes in psychiatry. A psychologist has a high level of training to help people overcome mental health issues. Some psychologists specialize in substance abuse or addiction treatment. A psychologist can very helpful when staging an intervention. A psychologist also works one-on-one with a recovering addict while in treatment.

Psy.D:

A Psy.D, also known as a Doctor of Psychology, is among the most advanced academic degrees in existence. It can take 4-8+ years to complete a Psy.D program. Getting a Psy.D involves intensive, hands-on clinical work and evaluation. A doctor of psychology (Psy.D) degree program places a strong emphasis on preparing students for practicing psychology in a clinical setting. Colleges and universities may offer a Psy.D program instead of a traditional Ph.D program in Clinical Psychology. In general, a student pursuing a Psy.D degree is interested in working with patients one-on-one to help them overcome mental health issues. Some psychologists with a Psy.D degree specialize in substance abuse and addiction treatment.

Qualifications:

License Number provided by State: PSY26001 California
School: Alliant International University CSPP LA
Years of Experience: 9 Years

Intake:

Adult Programs
Elderly Programs

Financials:

Payment Assistance
Session Fee: $100.00 - $150.00
Private Insurance
Medicare
Self-pay Options

Modality:

Individual Counseling:

In individual Counseling, a client meets one-on-one with a trained therapist or counselor. This kind of psychotherapy and focused attention is a crucial part of treating substance abuse and helping individuals overcome alcohol and drug addiction. Therapy can be instrumental in uncovering the root causes of addiction, such as challenges and struggles a patient has faced in their family, social, and work/school lives. Once these root causes (which often involve past trauma) are identified and worked through, substance abuse is much easier to overcome and sobriety to be reached. Different therapists use different therapeutic modalities, such as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, which has been shown to be effective in stopping addiction while also providing tools for maintaining sobriety.

Treatment:

Mental Health:

Mental health treatment focuses on helping patients manage and overcome mental illnesses, such as clinical depression, anxiety disorders, eating disorders, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and more. Mental health treatment can include one-on-one talk therapy (traditional psychotherapy), as well as more holistic or alternative modalities such as art therapy, equine therapy, eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR), and more. Group therapy can also prove beneficial in terms of overcoming mental health disorders. At mental health rehab facilities, a team of medical professionals — including doctors, therapists and counselors — are trained to treat many different types of mental health issues, and some also provide treatment for substance abuse and addiction. A therapist or counselor working at these facilities often offers one-on-one therapy to patients and leads group therapy sessions.

Bipolar:

Bipolar Disorder is a mental illness that generates unusual and extreme changes in a person's mood, energy levels and the ability to accomplish daily tasks and think clearly. A person with Bipolar Disorder can experience frequent highs (often referred to as mania or manic episodes) and lows (often referred to as depression or depressive episodes). Someone with Bipolar Disorder might "self-medicate" by using drugs and alcohol to deal with their mental or emotional issues. Substance abuse is more common with Bipolar Disorder than with any other mental health diagnosis. Suicide is a serious risk concern for an individual with Bipolar Disorder.

Depression:

Depression is a serious mood disorder. Signs and symptoms of depression include: fatigue, trouble sleeping, changes in appetite, lack of interest in activities a person used to enjoy, irritability, and suicidal thoughts. A depressed person might feel sad, anxious, or hopeless. Typically, symptoms must persist for at least two weeks before someone is diagnosed with clinical depression. Depression can affect people of all ages, ethnicities and socioeconomic backgrounds. An estimated 30% of people with substance abuse problems suffer from depression.

Grief:

Following the death of a loved one, it is normal to feel sad or experience grief. Typically, someone who is grieving will go through five stages: denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance. While grief is a natural response to loss, using alcohol or drugs to deal with one’s feelings is not a healthy way to cope. Using drugs and alcohol to manage or soothe feelings of grief could lead to substance abuse or addiction. Unresolved grief — and the depression that follows — could leave someone more vulnerable to developing a substance abuse problem.

PTSD and Trauma:

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a mental health disorder that someone can develop after experiencing a traumatic incident, such as a shooting, a natural disaster, a car accident, or sexual assault (i.e. rape or child sexual abuse). Symptoms of PTSD include reliving the event in one's mind; nightmares; avoiding situations that might trigger memories of the event; negative beliefs and feelings; and feeling jittery, angry or irritable. The main types of treatment for PTSD are psychotherapy and medication. Someone suffering from PTSD may experience depression, anxiety and substance abuse problems.

Techniques:

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy:

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a common therapy technique. This type of therapy focuses on the relationship between a person's thoughts, feelings and behaviors. For example, if you know that when you have the thought, "I'm worthless," you want to drink or do drugs, you can then make a new choice in the future when you have that thought (like calling a friend or going for a walk instead). Awareness is critical in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, the ultimate goal of which is to help patients develop healthy responses to their thoughts and feelings. CBT has been proven very helpful for people struggling with alcohol and drug addiction, as well other mental health issues, like eating disorders. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy helps a person become more self-aware and build up their ability to cope with problems in healthier ways. Many therapists, counselors, psychologists, and social workers use Cognitive Behavioral Therapy techniques when working with their patients.
Last Updated: 09/25/2018