Intake:

Treatment Duration: 30-90 days
Beds Available: 80
Programs for Women
Programs for Men
LGBTQ Programs
Adult Programs
Options for Adolescents
Elderly Programs
Young Adult Programs
Military Programs
Smoking Permitted
Bilingual Therapists
Hearing Impaired Programs

Financials:

Monthly Fee: $25,500.00
Private Insurance
Military Insurance
Financing Available
Self-pay Options

Modality:

Family Counseling:

Family Counseling can be for both the addict and his/her family, or may be solely for family members (without the addict present). Many support groups for family members of addicts see addiction as a family illness, not just the problem of one member of the family (the addict). Numerous research studies also demonstrate that recovery is far more successful and sustainable when loved ones -- especially family members -- participate in rehab and/or substance abuse treatment. Family support groups are also helpful since family members relating with an addict often need support themselves; it's a very stressful thing to deal with. Family support groups allow all members of the family to receive the benefits of treatment, and can include training on how to communicate effectively, establish healthy boundaries, and get support around the stress and trauma of addiction.

Individual Counseling:

In individual Counseling, a client meets one-on-one with a trained therapist or counselor. This kind of psychotherapy and focused attention is a crucial part of treating substance abuse and helping individuals overcome alcohol and drug addiction. Therapy can be instrumental in uncovering the root causes of addiction, such as challenges and struggles a patient has faced in their family, social, and work/school lives. Once these root causes (which often involve past trauma) are identified and worked through, substance abuse is much easier to overcome and sobriety to be reached. Different therapists use different therapeutic modalities, such as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, which has been shown to be effective in stopping addiction while also providing tools for maintaining sobriety.

Group Counseling:

Group Counseling is therapy that includes two or more people and is led by a mental health professional (usually a therapist or a counselor). Group therapy can help participants improve their social skills, talk about their problems with others, and work on their mental health issues. In group therapy, members can provide support for one another in the group. They can also offer advice on how a person in the group can cope with or deal with their problems. Some group therapy sessions focus on helping people suffering from alcoholism or drug addiction. Through group therapy, participants often feel less alone because they know that others struggle with the same issues.

Additional Services:

Aftercare Support:

When someone completes a drug or alcohol program, this does not mean that their treatment is over. It is extremely important for anyone recovering from alcoholism or drug addiction to have support while maintaining sobriety. Aftercare support involves making a plan for recovery and sobriety. This can include attending AA or NA meetings, moving to a halfway house or sober living home, finding a therapist or counselor who specializes in addiction, or participating in group therapy or family therapy while living at home. Many rehab facilities and mental health treatment centers offer some type of aftercare support for patients. A counselor or therapist can also work with patients to come up with an aftercare plan that helps them stay sober and live a happy, healthy life in recovery.

Medically Assisted Detox:

Summit Detox is a 20-bed medical facility that provides for the safe and comfortable detoxification from alcohol and drugs including heroin, opioids, and benzodiazepines. Located in sunny Boynton Beach, Florida, near the Intracoastal Waterway and the Atlantic Ocean, they serve patients 18 years and older from around the country in a safe and nurturing environment. They are the first step in living a healthy and sober life. They offer a medically supervised stable detox, including a vitamin regiment and innovative natural remedies that ensure you are not over- or under-medicated during detox. This enables you to be in the best frame of mind to accept continuing treatment. Depending on the substance, there are a variety of medications administered to step their patients down from their addiction. Their 24/7 medical supervision, caring staff, and premium rooms with amenities provide a solid foundation for recovery.

Vivitrol:

Vivitrol is an injectable prescription medicine used to treat alcohol and opioid dependence. Administered only with medical approval, VIVITROL blocks opioid receptors in the brain, which helps reduce cravings and prevent relapse. VIVITROL is non-addictive and extended-release, so it only needs to be taken once a month. Before starting VIVITROL, you must be opioid-free for at least 7-10 days in order to avoid sudden opioid withdrawal symptoms.

Naltrexone:

Naltrexone is an FDA-approved medication used to treat opioid and alcohol addiction. Naltrexone helps reduce cravings and prevent relapse, making recovery easier. It comes either in pill form (ReVia, Depade), taken once a day; or in an injectable form (Vivitrol), administered monthly. Patients must not have any illegal opioids or opioid medication in their system for at least 7-10 days before starting naltrexone (this includes methadone, so if you’re switching from methadone to naltrexone, you must wait until your system is clear).

24-Hour Clinical Care:

At certain points in the recovery process, it's important to have support available 24/7. 24-hour clinical care offers a safe environment in which to recover from drug or alcohol addiction in peace, knowing medical detox and other treatment will happen with professionals on hand.

Treatment Approach:

Individualized Approach:

When it comes to overcoming alcohol or drug addiction, there is no one-size-fits-all treatment that works for everyone. Instead of following a standard treatment plan, many mental health professionals offer an individual, personalized approach to treating substance abuse. Individualized treatment takes into account a person's unique physical, mental and emotional health and the specific ways addiction affects their life. An individualized treatment program also acknowledges that each patient has different needs. Therapists and counselors who offer individualized treatment seek to treat all aspects of a person's addiction, including helping them improve their physical, emotional and spiritual wellbeing.

Holistic Approach:

A holistic approach to treatment involves helping someone improve their physical, mental and emotional health. Holistic therapy focuses on the body, mind and soul to achieve optimal health and wellness. In treating addiction and substance abuse, holistic therapy practices are often used alongside more traditional treatment methods, such as psychotherapy, counseling or medication. Many drug and alcohol rehab centers offer some form of holistic therapy, such as yoga, nutrition therapy, meditation, acupuncture, massage, fitness classes, and art therapy. A counselor or a therapist might also recommend holistic therapy for patients struggling with drug and alcohol addiction. Additionally, a counselor might use a holistic approach when treating a patient. A holistic approach could also be beneficial in treating other mental health issues, like depression, anxiety, ADHD, bipolar disorder, etc. Holistic therapy is about more than overcoming addiction and maintaining sobriety: it's about treating the person as a whole — mind, body and spirit.

12-Step Approach:

A 12-step program is a treatment approach originally based on Alcoholics Anonymous (AA). The 12-step model is used in many drug and alcohol addiction recovery programs. Licensed therapists and counselors also employ 12-step methods when treating individuals who are struggling with substance abuse. The first stage of a 12-step program involves admitting that you are powerless over your addiction and believing in a higher power that can help you. Other steps involve making amends to those you have hurt in the past, connecting with a higher power through prayer and meditation, and helping others in their recovery from addiction. The 12-step model is used for Narcotics Anonymous (NA), Gamblers Anonymous (GA), and Sex and Love Addicts Anonymous (SLAA), among others. The 12-step model can be an effective way to help someone dealing with addiction, which is why it is used in a large number of treatment centers, as well as by therapists, counselors and mental health professionals.

Level of Care:

Intensive Outpatient:

This program consists of approximately 12-18 sessions, 3 times per week for 3 hours per session, and an additional session for Life Skills is included. This is intensive as it helps the client transition to a life without the use of alcohol and drugs. Focus is on creating a stable pattern of living through education, process groups and individualized treatment planning. In this program clients are expected to obtain a sponsor, join a home group and have a firm system in place for handling cravings and new relationships. Includes ongoing psychiatric and medical services.

Outpatient:

Outpatient programs are for those seeking mental rehab or drug rehab, but who also stay at home every night. The main difference between outpatient treatment (OP) and intensive outpatient treatment (IOP) lies in the amount of hours the patient spends at the facility. Most of the time an outpatient program is designed for someone who has completed an inpatient stay and is looking to continue their growth in recovery. Outpatient is not meant to be the starting point, it is commonly referred to as aftercare. Groups meet 1 time per week for 1 hour. The client will gain better insight into their use and the effects their disease has had on personal growth, family and relationships. Through group process they learn to deal with everyday stress and ongoing issues in recovery. Includes psychiatric and medical services.

Inpatient:

A residential treatment program offers housing and meals along with substance abuse treatment. These treatment centers allow patients to focus solely on recovery away from the stress and demands of daily life. There are short-term residential treatment programs (which last a few days or a couple of weeks) and long-term programs (which last several weeks or months). A residential treatment program can help someone get the support and therapy they need to overcome alcoholism and drug addiction. Many of these programs offer personalized treatment options, in which mental health professionals work one-on-one with patients during each stage of their recovery.

Treatment:

Mental Health and Substance Abuse:

A combined mental health and substance abuse treatment center is designed to treat individuals with both mental health and substance abuse issues. Therapists and staff at these kinds of centers help patients who struggle with both a drug and alcohol addiction, along with a mental health problem like clinical depression, anxiety disorders, Bipolar Disorder, and more. They're trained to help patients identify the root causes of their addiction and mental health issues, and to help manage both. Many addiction counselors specialize in treating individuals with mental health problems, and are well-equipped to deliver high-quality treatment to those struggling from addiction alongside a mental health issue.

Alcohol Abuse:

There are many warning signs for alcoholism. For someone who is abusing alcohol, excessive drinking affects their work, school and home life. Other symptoms of alcohol abuse include: memory loss or blacking out, engaging in risky behavior (like driving a car), and hurting yourself or someone else while drunk. Alcohol abuse can progress to alcoholism. An alcoholic can’t control when or how much they drink. For an alcoholic, the goal of treatment is abstinence. Treatment and recovery from alcoholism usually involves therapy or counseling, as well as 12 step programs and AA meetings.

Dual Diagnosis:

Dual diagnosis refers to the diagnosis given to a person or patient who struggles with addiction and has also been diagnosed with a mental or emotional illness. To treat someone with a dual diagnosis, rehab centers and other mental health facilities aim to provide comprehensive treatment for both the substance abuse and mental illness. At these facilities, counselors and therapists work with dual-diagnosis patients to help them manage their mental health problems and overcome addiction at the same time. Common co-occurring substance abuse and mental illnesses can include drug addiction or alcoholism alongside clinical depression, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder, and more. In some cases, a mental health illness can lead to an addiction issue, or vice versa: an addiction issue can create a mental health issue. It's important to treat both at the same time whenever possible.

Opioid Addiction:

Opiate addiction treatment focuses on helping individuals who want to overcome addiction to opiate drugs. These drugs include illicit substances like heroin, as well as prescription opioids like hydrocodone and oxycodone (prescription names include Vicodin and OxyContin). This kind of treatment deals with everything from the shame of addiction to strategies for maintaining sobriety. For example, many people start taking prescription opioids for a legitimate medical reason (such as recovery from surgery), and then become addicted. Once they can't get the prescription drug anymore (i.e. the surgery is over and there's no more medical reason for continued prescriptions), these people often turn to heroin. There can be a lot of shame and self-judgment involved in the unexpected decline of one's health and life path that accompanies something like heroin addiction. In individual and group therapy, such issues are explored, with the goal of healing. Some opiate addiction programs also address co-occurring mental health issues if those are present (i.e. a person has both clinical depression and struggles with opioid substance abuse). Treatment for opioid addiction can involve seeking out individual counseling, or going to a rehab center for full-time rehabilitation.

Sex:

Sex addiction involves an obsession with sexual thoughts or fantasies. Sex addiction can also mean engaging in compulsive sexual acts or behaviors. Signs of sex addiction include: loss of control over sexual urges, having multiple affairs, and addiction to pornography. For a sex addict, sexual behavior tends to have a negative effect on their life and relationships. A person with sex addiction, love addiction, or codependency issues could also struggle with substance abuse or drug addiction. A trained counselor or therapist can help a person overcome sex addiction and improve their relationships.

Video Games:

Video game addiction is being addicted to playing video games, so much that it interferes with daily life. Video game addiction is what's known as an "impulse control disorder," meaning the person can't stop themselves from playing (it's compulsive). Many times, video game addiction is a way of numbing out from life, or avoiding stressors like disconnection, loneliness, and difficult relationships. For those with video game addiction, playing video games has a negative impact on their work performance, schoolwork, personal relationships, and physical and mental health. Video game addiction can also be associated with anxiety, depression, ADHD, bipolar disorder, and other mental illnesses. While video game addiction is not yet recognized as a diagnosable disorder, recent studies suggest that up to 15% of gamers might exhibit signs of addiction. Treatment for video game addiction includes looking at the underlying issues behind it (i.e. why the person feels a need to numb out or use video games to disconnect), holding a compassionate response to the origin of the behavior, and moving past it.

Co-Dependency:

Co-Dependency refers to a relationship in which one person sacrifices their own wants and needs to "fix" or support the other partner. In a codependent relationship, love and intimacy are often experienced as one partner in distress, while the other partner "rescues" or enables them. Codependency can lead to substance abuse and addiction, and codependents may be less likely to seek help for their issues, as they tend to be the "helpers" in relationships. The term love addiction is used to describe a compulsive or constant pursuit of romantic love as a way to feel secure and worthy.

ADHD:

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is generally characterized by the inability to focus; not being able to get or stay organized; being impulsive; and being hyperactive (not being able to sit still). While it's normal to have trouble focusing and paying attention at times, for someone with ADHD, these behaviors are more extreme, occur more frequently, and make it hard to succeed or even function at work and/or at school. In order to be diagnosed with ADHD, a person must be seen by a healthcare professional such as a pediatrician, psychiatrist, or psychologist. Both children and adults can be diagnosed with ADHD. It is common for someone struggling with addiction or substance abuse issues to also struggle with ADHD, especially since many people seek out drugs or alcohol to help manage the symptoms of ADHD.

Anger:

Aggression, anger or violent behavior should not be ignored. Extreme feelings of anger can lead to distress, dysfunction and the inability to cope with one's emotions in a healthy way. A person with anger issues might have a sudden or uncontrollable outburst. Individuals with anger problems might also hold grudges, have trouble taking criticism, or feel like they have to “win” every argument. For someone struggling with addiction, anger issues could cause or worsen their substance abuse problem. Also, a person who is abusing drugs or alcohol could experience more intense feelings of anger.

Anxiety:

An anxiety disorder is the diagnosis for someone who experiences frequent or obsessive anxiety that doesn't go away. Signs of an anxiety disorder include excessive worrying; trouble concentrating; fear of making the wrong decision; and constantly feeling restless or inability to relax. Physical symptoms of an anxiety disorder include fatigue, poor sleep patterns, nervousness, nausea, sweating, and tense muscles. Anxiety disorders are one of the most common mental health issues that occur alongside substance abuse. Many addiction and substance abuse counselors are trained to help patients with a co-occurring anxiety disorder.

Bipolar:

Bipolar Disorder is a mental illness that generates unusual and extreme changes in a person's mood, energy levels and the ability to accomplish daily tasks and think clearly. A person with Bipolar Disorder can experience frequent highs (often referred to as mania or manic episodes) and lows (often referred to as depression or depressive episodes). Someone with Bipolar Disorder might "self-medicate" by using drugs and alcohol to deal with their mental or emotional issues. Substance abuse is more common with Bipolar Disorder than with any other mental health diagnosis. Suicide is a serious risk concern for an individual with Bipolar Disorder.

Depression:

Depression is a serious mood disorder. Signs and symptoms of depression include: fatigue, trouble sleeping, changes in appetite, lack of interest in activities a person used to enjoy, irritability, and suicidal thoughts. A depressed person might feel sad, anxious, or hopeless. Typically, symptoms must persist for at least two weeks before someone is diagnosed with clinical depression. Depression can affect people of all ages, ethnicities and socioeconomic backgrounds. An estimated 30% of people with substance abuse problems suffer from depression.

Grief:

Following the death of a loved one, it is normal to feel sad or experience grief. Typically, someone who is grieving will go through five stages: denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance. While grief is a natural response to loss, using alcohol or drugs to deal with one’s feelings is not a healthy way to cope. Using drugs and alcohol to manage or soothe feelings of grief could lead to substance abuse or addiction. Unresolved grief — and the depression that follows — could leave someone more vulnerable to developing a substance abuse problem.

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder:

A person with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) has repetitive, unwanted thoughts (obsessions), along with irrational, excessive urges (compulsions). Signs of OCD include: the urge to organize and clean things, feeling anxious, thoughts about hurting yourself or others, and washing your hands until skin becomes raw. Someone with OCD who is also struggling with alcohol or drug addiction may have more severe symptoms or behaviors. A counselor or therapist who specializes in both mental health and substance abuse treatment can help someone overcome addiction and deal with their OCD.

PTSD and Trauma:

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a mental health disorder that someone can develop after experiencing a traumatic incident, such as a shooting, a natural disaster, a car accident, or sexual assault (i.e. rape or child sexual abuse). Symptoms of PTSD include reliving the event in one's mind; nightmares; avoiding situations that might trigger memories of the event; negative beliefs and feelings; and feeling jittery, angry or irritable. The main types of treatment for PTSD are psychotherapy and medication. Someone suffering from PTSD may experience depression, anxiety and substance abuse problems.

Gambling Addiction:

Gambling addiction, also known as "compulsive gambling" or "problem gambling," is when a person cannot resist the urge to gamble. It's what's known as an "impulse control disorder," meaning the addict can't stop him- or herself from gambling (it's compulsive). Compulsive gambling often has very negative consequences for both the gambling addict and their loved ones, both emotional and financial. For example, compulsive gambling addicts can get into extreme financial trouble (i.e. bankruptcy or owing people or institutions like casinos thousands or hundreds of thousands of dollars), which impacts both that individual as well as those depending on them for financial support (family). Gambling addiction is often accompanied by behavioral or mood disorders, such as anxiety disorder, depression, ADHD or Bipolar Disorder. Individuals with a gambling problem may also struggle with substance abuse, alcoholism, or drug addiction.

Techniques:

Experiential Therapy:

Experiential therapy is different from traditional 'talk' therapy. In experiential therapy, a person works through issues by participating in real-life, hands-on experiences. For example, someone struggling with alcoholism or drug addiction might participate in outdoor activities, which is sometimes called wilderness therapy. Experiential therapy can also include creative activities (like music or making art), or having patients role-play a situation or problem by "acting it out" and using props. Many rehab facilities and mental health treatment centers offer some type of experiential therapy, such as: wilderness therapy, equine therapy (working with horses), creative arts therapy, and adventure therapy. Experiential therapy can help someone process trauma, heal from painful memories and experiences, and build new coping and social skills. This type of therapy can also boost a person's self-esteem and prepare them for success in their home life, relationships, social life and careers following treatment.

Life Skills:

Overcoming addiction is not easy. Someone struggling with alcohol or drug addiction faces many challenges in their personal and professional lives, and needs life skills to navigate them. Life skills simply means the skills one needs in life to function sucessfully in the world. A recovering addict might need help developing some of these life skills, like getting a job, time management, money management and having good communication skills. Along with providing therapy and support, many mental health professionals, such as therapists, counselors, and social workers, help patients improve their life skills. Some rehab centers offer life skills classes, which help patients job hunt, find a place to live, and learn better social skills, without needing drugs or alcohol to cope.

Sound Therapy:

Sound therapy (aka sound healing or vibrational medicine) uses sonic vibrations to stimulate healing at the cellular level. Vibrations, either from the human voice or resonant objects like tuning forks, gongs, or Tibetan bowls, affect cellular resonance in the body, which can help heal the impact of anxiety, depression, trauma, and more.

Hypnotherapy:

Hypnotherapy is also called guided hypnosis, and can be used to treat substance abuse. In hypnotherapy, a therapist helps a patient experience a trance-like state, engaging their subconscious in the healing process. Guided hypnosis could help someone quit smoking, or used to treat anxiety, phobias, and other mental health issues. A hypnotherapy session does not put a person 'to sleep' or leave them unconcious. Rather, it is a state of focused concentration that allows someone to access subconcious thoughts and emotions. While a patient is under hypnosis, a therapist can make positive or beneficial suggestions to influence their behavior. This type of therapy can help patients make deep, lasting changes and stop their addictive habits. Hypnotherapy is not meant to be a 'cure' for alcohol or drug addiction. However, it can be an effective therapy technique for some patients dealing with certain mental health issues.

Recreational Therapy:

Recreational therapy uses fun, creative and physical activities to help someone struggling with alcohol or drug addiction. During recreational therapy, a therapist leads clients in engaging and entertaining activies. These activities include: sports, games, making art, music, theater, dance, and going on field trips. Recreational therapy seeks to improve a patient's physical, social and emotional wellbeing. By participating in these activities, a recovering addict might learn new communication skills, develop a new hobby, and find new ways to socialize without using drugs or alcohol.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy:

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a common therapy technique. This type of therapy focuses on the relationship between a person's thoughts, feelings and behaviors. For example, if you know that when you have the thought, "I'm worthless," you want to drink or do drugs, you can then make a new choice in the future when you have that thought (like calling a friend or going for a walk instead). Awareness is critical in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, the ultimate goal of which is to help patients develop healthy responses to their thoughts and feelings. CBT has been proven very helpful for people struggling with alcohol and drug addiction, as well other mental health issues, like eating disorders. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy helps a person become more self-aware and build up their ability to cope with problems in healthier ways. Many therapists, counselors, psychologists, and social workers use Cognitive Behavioral Therapy techniques when working with their patients.

Dialectical Behavior Therapy:

Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) is type of therapy that helps someone understand the relationship between their thoughts, feelings and actions. Once a person understands this relationship, they can work on changing their behaviors and dealing with their problems in healthier ways. Dialectical Behavior Therapy has been proven clinically effective for people struggling with out-of-control emotions and some mental illnesses, like Borderline Personality Disorder. This type of therapy can also be helpful for individuals dealing with self-harm, such as self-mutilation (cutting) or having suicidal thoughts or urges. Dialectical Behavior Therapy often builds on the techniques and tools a patient learned in Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT), one of the most common types of therapy.

Trauma Therapy:

Trauma can be one of the main triggers and causes for addiction. Trauma therapy helps someone deal with a traumatic incident or event from their past. Trauma can stem from childhood sexual abuse; domestic violence; teenage or adult sexual assault; or losing one or both parents at a young age. There are other types of trauma as well, such as having a parent with a mental illness. These traumatic experiences often affect a person's life in the present. For instance, someone who was a victim of childhood sexual abuse often feels intense shame, fear, depression or guilt. Those who have experienced trauma often abuse drugs or alcohol as a way to cope with what happened to them in the past. The goal of trauma therapy is to help a patient process their trauma and move on, with the aid of a trained and compassionate mental health professional.

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing:

Eye Movement and Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) is based on the idea that disturbing memories are at the root of many issues. Through the use of eye-tracking movement exercises, clients learn coping and calming skills. An important part of the recovery process.

Motivational Interviewing:

Motivational interviewing is a technique that can help someone struggling with substance abuse. The goal of this method is to motivate people to change their behaviors. A motivational interviewer talks with a patient about why they want to change and encourages them to make a commitment to do so. Motivational interviewing is typically used as a short-term therapy method, where an interviewer will meet with a patient for one or two sessions. A licensed mental health professional can act as a motivational interviewer. During an intervention, an interviewer can help motivate someone to seek treatment for their addiction and make a solid commitment to change. A motivational interviewer aims to avoid arguing and direct confrontation. Instead, an interviewer serves as an empathetic, supportive listener and motivator who helps an addict overcome their ambivalence about seeking treatment.

Nutrition Therapy:

In treating addiction and other mental health issues, many benefit from a holistic approach, which can include nutritional therapy. Also known as medical nutritional therapy (MNT), nutritional therapy refers to changing one's diet to treat physical or emotional health issues. Nutritional therapy seeks to treat the body as a whole and promote physical, emotional and mental wellbeing. A nutritional therapist — which could refer to a professsional nutritionist or a registered dietitian — helps a person alleviate their health concerns through maintaining a healthy, balanced diet. A nutritional therapist makes diet and lifestyle recommendations, but they do not diagnose medical conditions or treat mental health issues directly. Many rehab facilities and addiction recovery centers offer some form of nutritional therapy.

Creative Arts Therapy:

We tend to think of therapy as 'talk' therapy, but this is not the only type of therapy. Creative arts therapy can help someone dealing with substance abuse or mental health issues in a different way. Creative arts therapy includes music, poetry/writing, painting, sculpting, dance, theater, sandplay, and other creative activities. This type of therapy helps someone express emotions, thoughts and experiences that might be hard to talk about. Creative arts therapy can be beneficial for children, teenagers and adults struggling with mental health problems, alcoholism and drug addiction. This form of therapy is not meant to replace 'talk' therapy or other types of treatment. However, creative arts therapy provides an important outlet for patients while in recovery.

Yoga:

Yoga is a holistic practice that can improve your physical, mental and emotional health. Yoga involves breathing exercises, physical movement, and meditation. Yoga can help you feel calmer, less stressed and more relaxed. An addict often turns to drugs or alcohol as an unhealthy way to cope with their problems. Yoga can be a healthy way to manage emotions and improve your mood. You do not need to be "in shape" to do yoga. People of all ages and body types can do some yoga poses, and nearly everyone can benefit from the physical effects of yoga, which include flexibility and resilience. Many rehab centers and mental health treatment facilities offer yoga classes. Some recovering addicts find yoga to be very beneficial in overcoming their addiction, as well as improving both their physical and mental health. Yoga is not meant to be a substitute for traditional therapy, counseling, or a rehabilitation program.

Yoga:

Yoga is a holistic practice that can improve your physical, mental and emotional health. Yoga involves breathing exercises, physical movement, and meditation. Yoga can help you feel calmer, less stressed and more relaxed. An addict often turns to drugs or alcohol as an unhealthy way to cope with their problems. Yoga can be a healthy way to manage emotions and improve your mood. You do not need to be "in shape" to do yoga. People of all ages and body types can do some yoga poses, and nearly everyone can benefit from the physical effects of yoga, which include flexibility and resilience. Many rehab centers and mental health treatment facilities offer yoga classes. Some recovering addicts find yoga to be very beneficial in overcoming their addiction, as well as improving both their physical and mental health. Yoga is not meant to be a substitute for traditional therapy, counseling, or a rehabilitation program.

Amenities:

Luxury Setting
Beach Setting
Private Rooms
Business Center
Outdoor Activities
Meditation
Meditation
Music Therapy
Music Therapy
Pool Available
Recreation Room
Recreation Room
Private Transportation
WiFi

Accreditations:

JCAHO
NAATP
CARF
Last Updated: 05/30/2018