Intake:

Treatment Duration: 30-85 days
Beds Available: 55
Programs for Women
Programs for Men
Adult Programs
Young Adult Programs
Smoking Permitted

Financials:

Daily Fee: $1,000.00
Monthly Fee: $15,000.00
Private Insurance
Self-pay Options

Modality:

Family Counseling:

Addiction is a family illness. When a family member engages in substance abuse, the entire family or support system is thrown into dysfunction. Addicts clearly suffer from the disease, and there are many loved ones who also suffer from the consequences of addiction. At Twin Lakes Recovery Center, they know that family education, support, and involvement in the treatment process leads to better outcomes for our clients. The Family Recovery Program is a 2 day program, held at their residential facility in Monroe, in which loved ones of clients join other families and receive education about the disease of addiction and co-occurring behavioral health disorders.

Individual Counseling:

In individual Counseling, a client meets one-on-one with a trained therapist or counselor. This kind of psychotherapy and focused attention is a crucial part of treating substance abuse and helping individuals overcome alcohol and drug addiction. Therapy can be instrumental in uncovering the root causes of addiction, such as challenges and struggles a patient has faced in their family, social, and work/school lives. Once these root causes (which often involve past trauma) are identified and worked through, substance abuse is much easier to overcome and sobriety to be reached. Different therapists use different therapeutic modalities, such as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, which has been shown to be effective in stopping addiction while also providing tools for maintaining sobriety.

Group Counseling:

Group Counseling is therapy that includes two or more people and is led by a mental health professional (usually a therapist or a counselor). Group therapy can help participants improve their social skills, talk about their problems with others, and work on their mental health issues. In group therapy, members can provide support for one another in the group. They can also offer advice on how a person in the group can cope with or deal with their problems. Some group therapy sessions focus on helping people suffering from alcoholism or drug addiction. Through group therapy, participants often feel less alone because they know that others struggle with the same issues.

Additional Services:

Medically Assisted Detox:

Alcohol and drug abuse has a harmful effect on the body, especially when, over time, a person has developed a physical dependence on drugs or alcohol. When someone is addicted to drugs or alcohol, the process of removing these harmful substances from the body is called detoxing. There are serious dangers to detoxing without the help of a medical professional. Detoxing in an unsafe way (for example, stopping suddenly and completely, i.e. cold turkey) can even be deadly. Medically assisted detox is done by a licensed medical professional, who monitors vital signs and keeps you safe while you're detoxing. It's very important for someone with a substance abuse problem to seek help before trying to detox on their own.

Medication-Assisted Treatment:

Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT) is the use of medications along with counseling and therapy to treat substance abuse. MAT is mainly used to treat opioid addictions (i.e. heroin and/or prescription drugs like OxyContin or Vicodin). Medications like buprenorphine are used in MAT to help normalize brain chemistry, block the effects of alcohol and/or opioids, relieve cravings, and stabilize body functions, making sobriety easier to maintain. All medications used are approved by the FDA, and every MAT program is tailored to the patient’s specific needs.

Psychotropic Medication:

Psychotropic medications (aka psychodynamic medication) are any medicines used specifically to affect and/or alter a patient's mind, emotions, and behaviors. Such psychiatric medicines are often used to change chemical levels in the brain that impact a person's mood and behavior. These medications include mood stabilizers, antidepressants, anti-ADHD drugs, and anti-anxiety medications.

Aftercare Support:

At Twin Lakes Recovery Center, they help clients build a solid foundation for lasting recovery. Recovery from drugs or alcohol is a lifelong process. Their goal is to provide the tools necessary to navigate the challenging journey of recovery. Their commitment to their clients in this process does not end when treatment ends, they offer continuing care services to all clients. Continuing care also includes access to Twin Lakes aftercare services. This includes consistent check-in calls from their clinical team throughout the first year following treatment. They want to stay connected, hear about continued growth, and help with challenges that may arise. Clients are also invited to participate in Twin Lakes alumni groups and gatherings. These provide incredible opportunities for fun, fellowship, and support in recovery.

Treatment Approach:

Individualized Approach:

Certain drug and alcohol rehab centers have standard treatment regimes they expect all patients to follow. Their team works closely with each client to develop an individual treatment plan, which becomes the guide for the treatment process. Through individual, group and family therapy we work with clients to help them uncover the core reasons for their use and build resiliency moving forward.

12-Step Approach:

A 12-step program is a treatment approach originally based on Alcoholics Anonymous (AA). The 12-step model is used in many drug and alcohol addiction recovery programs. Licensed therapists and counselors also employ 12-step methods when treating individuals who are struggling with substance abuse. The first stage of a 12-step program involves admitting that you are powerless over your addiction and believing in a higher power that can help you. Other steps involve making amends to those you have hurt in the past, connecting with a higher power through prayer and meditation, and helping others in their recovery from addiction. The 12-step model is used for Narcotics Anonymous (NA), Gamblers Anonymous (GA), and Sex and Love Addicts Anonymous (SLAA), among others. The 12-step model can be an effective way to help someone dealing with addiction, which is why it is used in a large number of treatment centers, as well as by therapists, counselors and mental health professionals.

Level of Care:

Inpatient:

Their inpatient residential treatment services allow those suffering from substance use and co-occurring disorders to focus on learning to live life without alcohol or other drugs and to develop the tools needed to navigate life without them. Living on-site at Twin Lakes allows residents to focus on recovery, free from distractions. Residential treatment allows clients to unplug from their usual routines (which are most often unhealthy) and fully engage in the treatment experience with the support of 24/7 clinical staff.

Treatment:

Mental Health and Substance Abuse:

A combined mental health and substance abuse treatment center is designed to treat individuals with both mental health and substance abuse issues. Therapists and staff at these kinds of centers help patients who struggle with both a drug and alcohol addiction, along with a mental health problem like clinical depression, anxiety disorders, Bipolar Disorder, and more. They're trained to help patients identify the root causes of their addiction and mental health issues, and to help manage both. Many addiction counselors specialize in treating individuals with mental health problems, and are well-equipped to deliver high-quality treatment to those struggling from addiction alongside a mental health issue.

Alcohol Abuse:

There are many warning signs for alcoholism. For someone who is abusing alcohol, excessive drinking affects their work, school and home life. Other symptoms of alcohol abuse include: memory loss or blacking out, engaging in risky behavior (like driving a car), and hurting yourself or someone else while drunk. Alcohol abuse can progress to alcoholism. An alcoholic can’t control when or how much they drink. For an alcoholic, the goal of treatment is abstinence. Treatment and recovery from alcoholism usually involves therapy or counseling, as well as 12 step programs and AA meetings.

Dual Diagnosis:

Dual diagnosis refers to the diagnosis given to a person or patient who struggles with addiction and has also been diagnosed with a mental or emotional illness. To treat someone with a dual diagnosis, rehab centers and other mental health facilities aim to provide comprehensive treatment for both the substance abuse and mental illness. At these facilities, counselors and therapists work with dual-diagnosis patients to help them manage their mental health problems and overcome addiction at the same time. Common co-occurring substance abuse and mental illnesses can include drug addiction or alcoholism alongside clinical depression, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder, and more. In some cases, a mental health illness can lead to an addiction issue, or vice versa: an addiction issue can create a mental health issue. It's important to treat both at the same time whenever possible.

Opioid Addiction:

Opiate addiction treatment focuses on helping individuals who want to overcome addiction to opiate drugs. These drugs include illicit substances like heroin, as well as prescription opioids like hydrocodone and oxycodone (prescription names include Vicodin and OxyContin). This kind of treatment deals with everything from the shame of addiction to strategies for maintaining sobriety. For example, many people start taking prescription opioids for a legitimate medical reason (such as recovery from surgery), and then become addicted. Once they can't get the prescription drug anymore (i.e. the surgery is over and there's no more medical reason for continued prescriptions), these people often turn to heroin. There can be a lot of shame and self-judgment involved in the unexpected decline of one's health and life path that accompanies something like heroin addiction. In individual and group therapy, such issues are explored, with the goal of healing. Some opiate addiction programs also address co-occurring mental health issues if those are present (i.e. a person has both clinical depression and struggles with opioid substance abuse). Treatment for opioid addiction can involve seeking out individual counseling, or going to a rehab center for full-time rehabilitation.

Anxiety:

An anxiety disorder is the diagnosis for someone who experiences frequent or obsessive anxiety that doesn't go away. Signs of an anxiety disorder include excessive worrying; trouble concentrating; fear of making the wrong decision; and constantly feeling restless or inability to relax. Physical symptoms of an anxiety disorder include fatigue, poor sleep patterns, nervousness, nausea, sweating, and tense muscles. Anxiety disorders are one of the most common mental health issues that occur alongside substance abuse. Many addiction and substance abuse counselors are trained to help patients with a co-occurring anxiety disorder.

Bipolar:

Bipolar Disorder is a mental illness that generates unusual and extreme changes in a person's mood, energy levels and the ability to accomplish daily tasks and think clearly. A person with Bipolar Disorder can experience frequent highs (often referred to as mania or manic episodes) and lows (often referred to as depression or depressive episodes). Someone with Bipolar Disorder might "self-medicate" by using drugs and alcohol to deal with their mental or emotional issues. Substance abuse is more common with Bipolar Disorder than with any other mental health diagnosis. Suicide is a serious risk concern for an individual with Bipolar Disorder.

Depression:

Depression is a serious mood disorder. Signs and symptoms of depression include: fatigue, trouble sleeping, changes in appetite, lack of interest in activities a person used to enjoy, irritability, and suicidal thoughts. A depressed person might feel sad, anxious, or hopeless. Typically, symptoms must persist for at least two weeks before someone is diagnosed with clinical depression. Depression can affect people of all ages, ethnicities and socioeconomic backgrounds. An estimated 30% of people with substance abuse problems suffer from depression.

PTSD and Trauma:

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a mental health disorder that someone can develop after experiencing a traumatic incident, such as a shooting, a natural disaster, a car accident, or sexual assault (i.e. rape or child sexual abuse). Symptoms of PTSD include reliving the event in one's mind; nightmares; avoiding situations that might trigger memories of the event; negative beliefs and feelings; and feeling jittery, angry or irritable. The main types of treatment for PTSD are psychotherapy and medication. Someone suffering from PTSD may experience depression, anxiety and substance abuse problems.

Techniques:

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy:

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a common therapy technique. This type of therapy focuses on the relationship between a person's thoughts, feelings and behaviors. For example, if you know that when you have the thought, "I'm worthless," you want to drink or do drugs, you can then make a new choice in the future when you have that thought (like calling a friend or going for a walk instead). Awareness is critical in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, the ultimate goal of which is to help patients develop healthy responses to their thoughts and feelings. CBT has been proven very helpful for people struggling with alcohol and drug addiction, as well other mental health issues, like eating disorders. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy helps a person become more self-aware and build up their ability to cope with problems in healthier ways. Many therapists, counselors, psychologists, and social workers use Cognitive Behavioral Therapy techniques when working with their patients.

Dialectical Behavior Therapy:

Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) is type of therapy that helps someone understand the relationship between their thoughts, feelings and actions. Once a person understands this relationship, they can work on changing their behaviors and dealing with their problems in healthier ways. Dialectical Behavior Therapy has been proven clinically effective for people struggling with out-of-control emotions and some mental illnesses, like Borderline Personality Disorder. This type of therapy can also be helpful for individuals dealing with self-harm, such as self-mutilation (cutting) or having suicidal thoughts or urges. Dialectical Behavior Therapy often builds on the techniques and tools a patient learned in Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT), one of the most common types of therapy.

Equine Therapy:

Equine therapy is a type of therapy that involves activities with horses. Equine therapy is also called equine-assisted therapy (EAT). Equine therapy does not necessarily mean riding horses, but can involve other activities such as feeding, grooming, haltering and leading horses. A mental health professional (like a therapist) is usually present during equine therapy, often along with a horse trainer. There are multiple mental health treatment facilities and rehab centers that offer equine therapy. By learning how to communicate with and lead horses, patients can learn social skills, work on trust and boundaries, and improve their confidence. Equine therapy is an experiential therapy technique, which takes a hands-on approach to helping a person deal with their thoughts, feelings and behaviors.

Experiential Therapy:

Experiential therapy is different from traditional 'talk' therapy. In experiential therapy, a person works through issues by participating in real-life, hands-on experiences. For example, someone struggling with alcoholism or drug addiction might participate in outdoor activities, which is sometimes called wilderness therapy. Experiential therapy can also include creative activities (like music or making art), or having patients role-play a situation or problem by "acting it out" and using props. Many rehab facilities and mental health treatment centers offer some type of experiential therapy, such as: wilderness therapy, equine therapy (working with horses), creative arts therapy, and adventure therapy. Experiential therapy can help someone process trauma, heal from painful memories and experiences, and build new coping and social skills. This type of therapy can also boost a person's self-esteem and prepare them for success in their home life, relationships, social life and careers following treatment.

Nutrition Therapy:

In treating addiction and other mental health issues, many benefit from a holistic approach, which can include nutritional therapy. Also known as medical nutritional therapy (MNT), nutritional therapy refers to changing one's diet to treat physical or emotional health issues. Nutritional therapy seeks to treat the body as a whole and promote physical, emotional and mental wellbeing. A nutritional therapist — which could refer to a professsional nutritionist or a registered dietitian — helps a person alleviate their health concerns through maintaining a healthy, balanced diet. A nutritional therapist makes diet and lifestyle recommendations, but they do not diagnose medical conditions or treat mental health issues directly. Many rehab facilities and addiction recovery centers offer some form of nutritional therapy.

Creative Arts Therapy:

We tend to think of therapy as 'talk' therapy, but this is not the only type of therapy. Creative arts therapy can help someone dealing with substance abuse or mental health issues in a different way. Creative arts therapy includes music, poetry/writing, painting, sculpting, dance, theater, sandplay, and other creative activities. This type of therapy helps someone express emotions, thoughts and experiences that might be hard to talk about. Creative arts therapy can be beneficial for children, teenagers and adults struggling with mental health problems, alcoholism and drug addiction. This form of therapy is not meant to replace 'talk' therapy or other types of treatment. However, creative arts therapy provides an important outlet for patients while in recovery.

Amenities:

Private Setting
Gym
Outdoor Activities
Meditation
Recreation Room
Athletic Equipment

Accreditations:

JCAHO: 601011
NAATP: 1678
Last Updated: 05/26/2019