Intake:

Treatment Duration: 28-42 days
Programs for Women
Programs for Men
LGBTQ Programs
Adult Programs
Young Adult Programs

Financials:

Daily Fee: $190.00
Private Insurance
Self-pay Options

Modality:

Family Counseling:

Research clearly demonstrates that recovery is far more successful and sustainable when loved ones like family members participate in rehab and substance abuse treatment. In Family Programming, family members/significant others participate in a client/family group to discuss issues relating to family relationships and ongoing recovery.

Individual Counseling:

In individual therapy, a patient meets one-on-one with a trained psychologist or counselor. Therapy is a pivotal part of effective substance abuse treatment, as it often covers root causes of addiction, including challenges faced by the patient in their social, family, and work/school life. Working with a New Hope therapist provides an accepting setting to talk openly about your thoughts, feelings and experiences. It can also help you improve communication, gain self-awareness, and implement healthy coping skills.

Group Counseling:

Group Counseling is therapy that includes two or more people and is led by a mental health professional (usually a therapist or a counselor). Group therapy can help participants improve their social skills, talk about their problems with others, and work on their mental health issues. In group therapy, members can provide support for one another in the group. They can also offer advice on how a person in the group can cope with or deal with their problems. Some group therapy sessions focus on helping people suffering from alcoholism or drug addiction. Through group therapy, participants often feel less alone because they know that others struggle with the same issues.

Additional Services:

Aftercare Support:

A continuum of care is one of the most important aspects of successful recovery following any type of treatment program. Their Aftercare Program includes weekly group meetings for clients that were successfully discharged from a higher level of care and are looking to continually better themselves and remain in recovery. Aftercare is a part of a complete life-care program that covers all aspects of living a healthy, fruitful sober life. A good Aftercare program prepares those who have completed alcohol or drug addiction treatment to enter the period of early recovery. It helps maintain and build on the gains made during their treatment for drug and alcohol addiction. The Aftercare program starts immediately following addiction treatment and is critical to help prevent relapse and to achieve optimal outcomes.

Sober Living Homes:

Sober Living Houses (SLHs), aka sober homes or halfway houses, are safe, substance-free, supportive living facilities for those recovering from substance abuse. Ideal for those who've just been through inpatient or outpatient treatment, SLHs are supervised environments with rules that support sobriety, such as curfews, shared chores, and therapeutic meetings. Residents are also often trained on life skills and coping skills to make it easier to transition into society. SLHs also provide a strong sense of community that can lead to the kind of deep and lasting connections with other sober individuals that supports a new, healthy lifestyle.

Treatment Approach:

Holistic Approach:

New Hope Recovery Center provides holistic psychological counseling that focuses on your strengths and guides you toward achieving wellness, happiness and success in your life. Their goal is to help you feel your best through our mind, body and spirit approach to healing.

Individualized Approach:

When it comes to overcoming alcohol or drug addiction, there is no one-size-fits-all treatment that works for everyone. Instead of following a standard treatment plan, many mental health professionals offer an individual, personalized approach to treating substance abuse. Individualized treatment takes into account a person's unique physical, mental and emotional health and the specific ways addiction affects their life. An individualized treatment program also acknowledges that each patient has different needs. Therapists and counselors who offer individualized treatment seek to treat all aspects of a person's addiction, including helping them improve their physical, emotional and spiritual wellbeing.

12-Step Approach:

12-step programs are addiction recovery models based on Alcoholics Anonymous (AA). A number of substance abuse programs (including some drug and alcohol rehab centers) use the 12 steps as a basis for treatment. Beginning steps involve admitting powerlessness over the addiction and creating a spiritual basis for recovery. Middle steps including making direct amends to those who've been hurt by the addiction, and the final step is to assist others in addiction recovery in the same way. Volunteers from AA come in and discuss how AA has impacted their lives and provide helpful insights on how someone can be successful in working the 12-Step program.

Level of Care:

Partial Hospitalization Program:

A partial hospitalization program (PHP) is a treatment program for patients who do not need 24-hour care. These programs usually help individuals with mental illnesses, but they can also help those struggling with substance abuse issues. In a PHP program, patients typically have structured treatment programs, like group or individual therapy, and meet 3-5 days a week for 6 hours or less. In some PHP programs, patients sleep on site. PHP programs can last up to 6 months and some offer transportation and meals. A PHP program can be a bridge between inpatient and outpatient treatment. A counselor working with patients in a PHP program can help them return to normal life, while still providing support during this transition.

Intensive Outpatient:

Their Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP) is suitable for individuals who live in the area or can possibly arrange nearby accommodations to the New Hope Recovery Center offices as well as maintain sobriety in their own living environments. Their clients generally attend programming either in the evening from 6:00 pm-9:00 pm or during the day from 8:30 am-11:45 am. This program gives an individual the opportunity to interact in their daily work/school/home environments while benefiting from a structured and supportive therapeutic treatment program. The program includes individual and group therapy, 12-step meetings and family programming which occurs every Saturday from 9:30 am until 1:00 pm.

Outpatient:

An outpatient program is a treatment program for someone struggling with alcoholism, drug addiction or a serious mental health issue, where patients live at home while going through the program. A person enrolled in a residential or inpatient program might transition into an outpatient program. An outpatient program can last several weeks or months, depending on the treatment center or facility. Someone in an outpatient program will usually attend group therapy or individual therapy sessions multiple times a week, while still living at home. An outpatient program is also referred to as aftercare. It's important to make a plan for maintaining sobriety and continuing therapy while in recovery. A counselor or therapist can work with patients in an outpatient program to make sure they are getting the support they need.

Treatment:

Mental Health and Substance Abuse:

New Hope Recovery Center utilizes the disease model in treating drug addiction. They believe that addictions are treatable conditions much like any other life threatening illness. Each client at New Hope Recovery Center is treated from a client-centered, holistic perspective that recognizes the unique needs of the individual – mind, body and spirit. This is accomplished through customized treatment plans utilizing input from both clients and their family members.

Alcohol Abuse:

There are many warning signs for alcoholism. For someone who is abusing alcohol, excessive drinking affects their work, school and home life. Other symptoms of alcohol abuse include: memory loss or blacking out, engaging in risky behavior (like driving a car), and hurting yourself or someone else while drunk. Alcohol abuse can progress to alcoholism. An alcoholic can’t control when or how much they drink. For an alcoholic, the goal of treatment is abstinence. Treatment and recovery from alcoholism usually involves therapy or counseling, as well as 12 step programs and AA meetings.

Opioid Addiction:

Opiate addiction treatment focuses on helping individuals who want to overcome addiction to opiate drugs. These drugs include illicit substances like heroin, as well as prescription opioids like hydrocodone and oxycodone (prescription names include Vicodin and OxyContin). This kind of treatment deals with everything from the shame of addiction to strategies for maintaining sobriety. For example, many people start taking prescription opioids for a legitimate medical reason (such as recovery from surgery), and then become addicted. Once they can't get the prescription drug anymore (i.e. the surgery is over and there's no more medical reason for continued prescriptions), these people often turn to heroin. There can be a lot of shame and self-judgment involved in the unexpected decline of one's health and life path that accompanies something like heroin addiction. In individual and group therapy, such issues are explored, with the goal of healing. Some opiate addiction programs also address co-occurring mental health issues if those are present (i.e. a person has both clinical depression and struggles with opioid substance abuse). Treatment for opioid addiction can involve seeking out individual counseling, or going to a rehab center for full-time rehabilitation.

Sex:

Sex addiction involves an obsession with sexual thoughts or fantasies. Sex addiction can also mean engaging in compulsive sexual acts or behaviors. Signs of sex addiction include: loss of control over sexual urges, having multiple affairs, and addiction to pornography. For a sex addict, sexual behavior tends to have a negative effect on their life and relationships. A person with sex addiction, love addiction, or codependency issues could also struggle with substance abuse or drug addiction. A trained counselor or therapist can help a person overcome sex addiction and improve their relationships.

ADHD:

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is generally characterized by the inability to focus; not being able to get or stay organized; being impulsive; and being hyperactive (not being able to sit still). While it's normal to have trouble focusing and paying attention at times, for someone with ADHD, these behaviors are more extreme, occur more frequently, and make it hard to succeed or even function at work and/or at school. In order to be diagnosed with ADHD, a person must be seen by a healthcare professional such as a pediatrician, psychiatrist, or psychologist. Both children and adults can be diagnosed with ADHD. It is common for someone struggling with addiction or substance abuse issues to also struggle with ADHD, especially since many people seek out drugs or alcohol to help manage the symptoms of ADHD.

Anger:

Aggression, anger or violent behavior should not be ignored. Extreme feelings of anger can lead to distress, dysfunction and the inability to cope with one's emotions in a healthy way. A person with anger issues might have a sudden or uncontrollable outburst. Individuals with anger problems might also hold grudges, have trouble taking criticism, or feel like they have to “win” every argument. For someone struggling with addiction, anger issues could cause or worsen their substance abuse problem. Also, a person who is abusing drugs or alcohol could experience more intense feelings of anger.

Anxiety:

An anxiety disorder is the diagnosis for someone who experiences frequent or obsessive anxiety that doesn't go away. Signs of an anxiety disorder include excessive worrying; trouble concentrating; fear of making the wrong decision; and constantly feeling restless or inability to relax. Physical symptoms of an anxiety disorder include fatigue, poor sleep patterns, nervousness, nausea, sweating, and tense muscles. Anxiety disorders are one of the most common mental health issues that occur alongside substance abuse. Many addiction and substance abuse counselors are trained to help patients with a co-occurring anxiety disorder.

Bipolar:

Bipolar Disorder is a mental illness that generates unusual and extreme changes in a person's mood, energy levels and the ability to accomplish daily tasks and think clearly. A person with Bipolar Disorder can experience frequent highs (often referred to as mania or manic episodes) and lows (often referred to as depression or depressive episodes). Someone with Bipolar Disorder might "self-medicate" by using drugs and alcohol to deal with their mental or emotional issues. Substance abuse is more common with Bipolar Disorder than with any other mental health diagnosis. Suicide is a serious risk concern for an individual with Bipolar Disorder.

Depression:

Depression is a serious mood disorder. Signs and symptoms of depression include: fatigue, trouble sleeping, changes in appetite, lack of interest in activities a person used to enjoy, irritability, and suicidal thoughts. A depressed person might feel sad, anxious, or hopeless. Typically, symptoms must persist for at least two weeks before someone is diagnosed with clinical depression. Depression can affect people of all ages, ethnicities and socioeconomic backgrounds. An estimated 30% of people with substance abuse problems suffer from depression.

Eating Disorders:

Eating disorders are often considered food addictions, in that food is used in an addictive way (similar to drug or alcohol addiction). Common types of eating disorders include anorexia, bulimia, binge eating, and dysfunctional eating patterns. Signs and symptoms can include dramatic weight loss; concern about eating in public; an intense fear of being "fat", even though underweight; having an excessive, rigid exercise regime; and rigid thinking. Multiple rehab facilities and substance abuse treatment programs offer treatment for eating disorders, and there are also individual counselors who specifically treat eating disorders (outside just rehab clinics). For some individuals, an eating disorder may occur alongside a drug or alcohol problem. In order to help someone get the care they need, it’s important to see a therapist who is trained in treating both eating disorders and addiction.

Grief:

Following the death of a loved one, it is normal to feel sad or experience grief. Typically, someone who is grieving will go through five stages: denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance. While grief is a natural response to loss, using alcohol or drugs to deal with one’s feelings is not a healthy way to cope. Using drugs and alcohol to manage or soothe feelings of grief could lead to substance abuse or addiction. Unresolved grief — and the depression that follows — could leave someone more vulnerable to developing a substance abuse problem.

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder:

A person with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) has repetitive, unwanted thoughts (obsessions), along with irrational, excessive urges (compulsions). Signs of OCD include: the urge to organize and clean things, feeling anxious, thoughts about hurting yourself or others, and washing your hands until skin becomes raw. Someone with OCD who is also struggling with alcohol or drug addiction may have more severe symptoms or behaviors. A counselor or therapist who specializes in both mental health and substance abuse treatment can help someone overcome addiction and deal with their OCD.

PTSD and Trauma:

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a mental health disorder that someone can develop after experiencing a traumatic incident, such as a shooting, a natural disaster, a car accident, or sexual assault (i.e. rape or child sexual abuse). Symptoms of PTSD include reliving the event in one's mind; nightmares; avoiding situations that might trigger memories of the event; negative beliefs and feelings; and feeling jittery, angry or irritable. The main types of treatment for PTSD are psychotherapy and medication. Someone suffering from PTSD may experience depression, anxiety and substance abuse problems.

Gambling Addiction:

Gambling addiction, also known as "compulsive gambling" or "problem gambling," is when a person cannot resist the urge to gamble. It's what's known as an "impulse control disorder," meaning the addict can't stop him- or herself from gambling (it's compulsive). Compulsive gambling often has very negative consequences for both the gambling addict and their loved ones, both emotional and financial. For example, compulsive gambling addicts can get into extreme financial trouble (i.e. bankruptcy or owing people or institutions like casinos thousands or hundreds of thousands of dollars), which impacts both that individual as well as those depending on them for financial support (family). Gambling addiction is often accompanied by behavioral or mood disorders, such as anxiety disorder, depression, ADHD or Bipolar Disorder. Individuals with a gambling problem may also struggle with substance abuse, alcoholism, or drug addiction.

Techniques:

Experiential Therapy:

Experiential therapy is different from traditional 'talk' therapy. In experiential therapy, a person works through issues by participating in real-life, hands-on experiences. For example, someone struggling with alcoholism or drug addiction might participate in outdoor activities, which is sometimes called wilderness therapy. Experiential therapy can also include creative activities (like music or making art), or having patients role-play a situation or problem by "acting it out" and using props. Many rehab facilities and mental health treatment centers offer some type of experiential therapy, such as: wilderness therapy, equine therapy (working with horses), creative arts therapy, and adventure therapy. Experiential therapy can help someone process trauma, heal from painful memories and experiences, and build new coping and social skills. This type of therapy can also boost a person's self-esteem and prepare them for success in their home life, relationships, social life and careers following treatment.

Nutrition Therapy:

Nutrition therapy, aka medical nutrition therapy (MNT), is a way of treating physical, emotional, and medical conditions through diet. The Nutrition Workshop offers nutritional education about the importance of healthy eating habits, balanced/nourishing eating, physical activity, adequate sleep and meal planning.

Yoga:

Yoga is a holistic practice that can improve your physical, mental and emotional health. Yoga involves breathing exercises, physical movement, and meditation. Yoga can help you feel calmer, less stressed and more relaxed. An addict often turns to drugs or alcohol as an unhealthy way to cope with their problems. Yoga can be a healthy way to manage emotions and improve your mood. You do not need to be "in shape" to do yoga. People of all ages and body types can do some yoga poses, and nearly everyone can benefit from the physical effects of yoga, which include flexibility and resilience. Many rehab centers and mental health treatment facilities offer yoga classes. Some recovering addicts find yoga to be very beneficial in overcoming their addiction, as well as improving both their physical and mental health. Yoga is not meant to be a substitute for traditional therapy, counseling, or a rehabilitation program.

Amenities:

Private Setting
Average Location
Meditation

Accreditations:

JCAHO: 546570
Last Updated: 03/24/2019