Overview:

Psychologist:

Many people have a hard time understanding the difference between a psychologist and a psychiatrist. A clinical psychologist has a doctorate degree in psychology and must be licensed by the state in order to diagnose and treat patients. A psychiatrist goes to medical school and specializes in psychiatry. A psychologist has a high level of training to help people overcome mental health issues. Some psychologists specialize in substance abuse or addiction treatment. A psychologist can very helpful when staging an intervention. A psychologist also works one-on-one with a recovering addict while in treatment.

MA:

A master of arts (MA) is an advanced academic degree, typically in the fields of literature, history, geography, philosophy, social sciences, fine arts and languages. Getting a master's degree is a requirement for therapists and counselors practicing in healthcare and mental health. Many therapists get an MA in Psychology, Counseling Psychology, or Clinical Mental Health Counseling (different schools offer different degree programs). Many counselors get an MA in Counseling. This degree is the academic prerequisite to become a substance abuse counselor or a marriage and family therapist (it is the "school" part of a therapist or counselor's training).

Qualifications:

License Number provided by State: 6301015852 Michigan
School: Michigan School of Professional Psychology
Years of Experience: 3 Years
Year Graduated: 2013

Intake:

LGBTQ Programs
Adult Programs
Options for Adolescents

Financials:

Payment Assistance
Session Fee: $100.00 - $150.00
Private Insurance
Medicare
Self-pay Options

Modality:

Individual Counseling:

In individual Counseling, a client meets one-on-one with a trained therapist or counselor. This kind of psychotherapy and focused attention is a crucial part of treating substance abuse and helping individuals overcome alcohol and drug addiction. Therapy can be instrumental in uncovering the root causes of addiction, such as challenges and struggles a patient has faced in their family, social, and work/school lives. Once these root causes (which often involve past trauma) are identified and worked through, substance abuse is much easier to overcome and sobriety to be reached. Different therapists use different therapeutic modalities, such as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, which has been shown to be effective in stopping addiction while also providing tools for maintaining sobriety.

Treatment:

Mental Health:

Mental health treatment focuses on helping patients manage and overcome mental illnesses, such as clinical depression, anxiety disorders, eating disorders, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and more. Mental health treatment can include one-on-one talk therapy (traditional psychotherapy), as well as more holistic or alternative modalities such as art therapy, equine therapy, eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR), and more. Group therapy can also prove beneficial in terms of overcoming mental health disorders. At mental health rehab facilities, a team of medical professionals — including doctors, therapists and counselors — are trained to treat many different types of mental health issues, and some also provide treatment for substance abuse and addiction. A therapist or counselor working at these facilities often offers one-on-one therapy to patients and leads group therapy sessions.

ADHD:

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is generally characterized by the inability to focus; not being able to get or stay organized; being impulsive; and being hyperactive (not being able to sit still). While it's normal to have trouble focusing and paying attention at times, for someone with ADHD, these behaviors are more extreme, occur more frequently, and make it hard to succeed or even function at work and/or at school. In order to be diagnosed with ADHD, a person must be seen by a healthcare professional such as a pediatrician, psychiatrist, or psychologist. Both children and adults can be diagnosed with ADHD. It is common for someone struggling with addiction or substance abuse issues to also struggle with ADHD, especially since many people seek out drugs or alcohol to help manage the symptoms of ADHD.

Anxiety:

An anxiety disorder is the diagnosis for someone who experiences frequent or obsessive anxiety that doesn't go away. Signs of an anxiety disorder include excessive worrying; trouble concentrating; fear of making the wrong decision; and constantly feeling restless or inability to relax. Physical symptoms of an anxiety disorder include fatigue, poor sleep patterns, nervousness, nausea, sweating, and tense muscles. Anxiety disorders are one of the most common mental health issues that occur alongside substance abuse. Many addiction and substance abuse counselors are trained to help patients with a co-occurring anxiety disorder.

Bipolar:

Bipolar Disorder is a mental illness that generates unusual and extreme changes in a person's mood, energy levels and the ability to accomplish daily tasks and think clearly. A person with Bipolar Disorder can experience frequent highs (often referred to as mania or manic episodes) and lows (often referred to as depression or depressive episodes). Someone with Bipolar Disorder might "self-medicate" by using drugs and alcohol to deal with their mental or emotional issues. Substance abuse is more common with Bipolar Disorder than with any other mental health diagnosis. Suicide is a serious risk concern for an individual with Bipolar Disorder.

Depression:

Depression is a serious mood disorder. Signs and symptoms of depression include: fatigue, trouble sleeping, changes in appetite, lack of interest in activities a person used to enjoy, irritability, and suicidal thoughts. A depressed person might feel sad, anxious, or hopeless. Typically, symptoms must persist for at least two weeks before someone is diagnosed with clinical depression. Depression can affect people of all ages, ethnicities and socioeconomic backgrounds. An estimated 30% of people with substance abuse problems suffer from depression.

Eating Disorders:

Eating disorders are often considered food addictions, in that food is used in an addictive way (similar to drug or alcohol addiction). Common types of eating disorders include anorexia, bulimia, binge eating, and dysfunctional eating patterns. Signs and symptoms can include dramatic weight loss; concern about eating in public; an intense fear of being "fat", even though underweight; having an excessive, rigid exercise regime; and rigid thinking. Multiple rehab facilities and substance abuse treatment programs offer treatment for eating disorders, and there are also individual counselors who specifically treat eating disorders (outside just rehab clinics). For some individuals, an eating disorder may occur alongside a drug or alcohol problem. In order to help someone get the care they need, it’s important to see a therapist who is trained in treating both eating disorders and addiction.

Grief:

Following the death of a loved one, it is normal to feel sad or experience grief. Typically, someone who is grieving will go through five stages: denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance. While grief is a natural response to loss, using alcohol or drugs to deal with one’s feelings is not a healthy way to cope. Using drugs and alcohol to manage or soothe feelings of grief could lead to substance abuse or addiction. Unresolved grief — and the depression that follows — could leave someone more vulnerable to developing a substance abuse problem.

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder:

A person with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) has repetitive, unwanted thoughts (obsessions), along with irrational, excessive urges (compulsions). Signs of OCD include: the urge to organize and clean things, feeling anxious, thoughts about hurting yourself or others, and washing your hands until skin becomes raw. Someone with OCD who is also struggling with alcohol or drug addiction may have more severe symptoms or behaviors. A counselor or therapist who specializes in both mental health and substance abuse treatment can help someone overcome addiction and deal with their OCD.

PTSD and Trauma:

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a mental health disorder that someone can develop after experiencing a traumatic incident, such as a shooting, a natural disaster, a car accident, or sexual assault (i.e. rape or child sexual abuse). Symptoms of PTSD include reliving the event in one's mind; nightmares; avoiding situations that might trigger memories of the event; negative beliefs and feelings; and feeling jittery, angry or irritable. The main types of treatment for PTSD are psychotherapy and medication. Someone suffering from PTSD may experience depression, anxiety and substance abuse problems.

Stress:

Stress is a normal part of life. Everyone experiences it from time to time, especially in times of transition, like losing a loved one; losing a job; moving from one place to another; or getting married or divorced. However, extreme stress can negatively impact a person's physical or mental health, especially if it isn't dealt with appropriately. Chronic stress (meaning stress that doesn't stop) can also lead to more serious issues, such as depression, anxiety disorders, eating disorders, and other mental health issues. Someone who suffers from chronic stress is not likely recognize the true extent of their stress level, and usually tries to obsessively control every task. Stress is also a known risk factor for misusing or abusing drugs and alcohol (i.e. if a person is both in an abusive relationship and dealing with the death of a parent, it can be easy to turn to drugs or alcohol to numb the pain and the grief). Addressing stress is often a part of therapy (one-on-one or group therapy) in the treatment process, as is exploring healthier ways of handling stress that don't involve substance abuse. When it comes to addiction, stress is almost always part of the equation, but there are many healthy and productive ways of dealing with it that support sobriety.

Techniques:

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy:

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a common therapy technique. This type of therapy focuses on the relationship between a person's thoughts, feelings and behaviors. For example, if you know that when you have the thought, "I'm worthless," you want to drink or do drugs, you can then make a new choice in the future when you have that thought (like calling a friend or going for a walk instead). Awareness is critical in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, the ultimate goal of which is to help patients develop healthy responses to their thoughts and feelings. CBT has been proven very helpful for people struggling with alcohol and drug addiction, as well other mental health issues, like eating disorders. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy helps a person become more self-aware and build up their ability to cope with problems in healthier ways. Many therapists, counselors, psychologists, and social workers use Cognitive Behavioral Therapy techniques when working with their patients.

Creative Arts Therapy:

We tend to think of therapy as 'talk' therapy, but this is not the only type of therapy. Creative arts therapy can help someone dealing with substance abuse or mental health issues in a different way. Creative arts therapy includes music, poetry/writing, painting, sculpting, dance, theater, sandplay, and other creative activities. This type of therapy helps someone express emotions, thoughts and experiences that might be hard to talk about. Creative arts therapy can be beneficial for children, teenagers and adults struggling with mental health problems, alcoholism and drug addiction. This form of therapy is not meant to replace 'talk' therapy or other types of treatment. However, creative arts therapy provides an important outlet for patients while in recovery.
Last Updated: 10/17/2018