Intake:

Treatment Duration: 23-28 days
Programs for Women
Programs for Men
Adult Programs
Options for Adolescents
Young Adult Programs
Smoking Permitted

Financials:

Monthly Fee: $1,200.00
Private Insurance
Medicaid
Medicare
Financing Available
Self-pay Options

Modality:

Family Counseling:

Family/Parent Support Group is a service the Bryan Independence Center offers to support families and parents of individuals experiencing substance use and addiction issues. You do not need to be involved with services at the Bryan Independence Center to attend. The group is available to all families and parents in the community free of charge. No registration is necessary. Participants may have a family member already in substance use counseling or they may have just discovered that their family member is having substance use issues.

Individual Counseling:

In individual Counseling, a client meets one-on-one with a trained therapist or counselor. This kind of psychotherapy and focused attention is a crucial part of treating substance abuse and helping individuals overcome alcohol and drug addiction. Therapy can be instrumental in uncovering the root causes of addiction, such as challenges and struggles a patient has faced in their family, social, and work/school lives. Once these root causes (which often involve past trauma) are identified and worked through, substance abuse is much easier to overcome and sobriety to be reached. Different therapists use different therapeutic modalities, such as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, which has been shown to be effective in stopping addiction while also providing tools for maintaining sobriety.

Group Counseling:

Group Counseling is therapy that includes two or more people and is led by a mental health professional (usually a therapist or a counselor). Group therapy can help participants improve their social skills, talk about their problems with others, and work on their mental health issues. In group therapy, members can provide support for one another in the group. They can also offer advice on how a person in the group can cope with or deal with their problems. Some group therapy sessions focus on helping people suffering from alcoholism or drug addiction. Through group therapy, participants often feel less alone because they know that others struggle with the same issues.

Additional Services:

Medically Assisted Detox:

This is recommended for clients who are medically unstable and unable to attend programming. Length of stay averages from one to five days with 24-hour care. Includes daily physician visits and intense medical monitoring by nursing staff. Medical detox is done by licensed medical professionals who monitor vital signs and keep you safe, healthy, and as comfortable as possible as you go through detox and withdrawal.

Psychotropic Medication:

Psychotropic medications (aka psychodynamic medication) are any medicines used specifically to affect and/or alter a patient's mind, emotions, and behaviors. Such psychiatric medicines are often used to change chemical levels in the brain that impact a person's mood and behavior. These medications include mood stabilizers, antidepressants, anti-ADHD drugs, and anti-anxiety medications.

24-Hour Clinical Care:

At certain points in the recovery process, it's important to have support available 24/7. 24-hour clinical care offers a safe environment in which to recover from drug or alcohol addiction in peace, knowing medical detox and other treatment will happen with professionals on hand.

Aftercare Support:

They begin discharge planning upon admission during the assessment process and continue the discharge planning throughout care. They make every effort to involve the family to support the discharge plans. Their after care support groups meet on Mondays and Thursdays at 7 pm. These groups are free and open to any Bryan Independence Center alumni. Groups are facilitated by alumni. Alumni share their experiences of living a sober lifestyle and offer support to others who are working on sobriety. This is a great way to stay connected to treatment peers and learn from other alumni members who are successfully living a life of recovery. Bryan Independence Center Alumni Association (ICAA) is a volunteer organization of treatment graduates, their friends and family members serving in a support role for the Bryan Independence Center.

Treatment Approach:

Holistic Approach:

A holistic approach to treatment involves helping someone improve their physical, mental and emotional health. Holistic therapy focuses on the body, mind and soul to achieve optimal health and wellness. In treating addiction and substance abuse, holistic therapy practices are often used alongside more traditional treatment methods, such as psychotherapy, counseling or medication. Many drug and alcohol rehab centers offer some form of holistic therapy, such as yoga, nutrition therapy, meditation, acupuncture, massage, fitness classes, and art therapy. A counselor or a therapist might also recommend holistic therapy for patients struggling with drug and alcohol addiction. Additionally, a counselor might use a holistic approach when treating a patient. A holistic approach could also be beneficial in treating other mental health issues, like depression, anxiety, ADHD, bipolar disorder, etc. Holistic therapy is about more than overcoming addiction and maintaining sobriety: it's about treating the person as a whole — mind, body and spirit.

Religious Approach:

Religion-based rehab refers to a recovery program that uses a specific religion or religious practice as the basis for treatment. These addiction treatment programs view faith as an important part of recovery and sobriety. Religion-based treatment programs can involve many religions, such as Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, etc. In these programs, counselors and peers use the teachings of a religion to offer support and guidance. Connecting with one's faith can help someone in a religion-based program build a strong foundation for recovery. Faith-based recovery programs can also provide inspiration, comfort, and support in a meaningful way. Some addiction treatment programs, like Alcoholics Anonymous (AA), are not based on the teachings of a specific religion, but do emphasize a spiritual practice and the importance of connecting with a higher power.

Individualized Approach:

Each level of care consists of a well planned, individually tailored series of therapies that draw from a variety of resources, including counseling, group therapy, education, family services and medical care. Careful assessment helps determine the least restrictive, most effective level of care. When clients are transferred to different levels of care during their treatment stay, our emphasis is on continuity of care and open communication with the client and family.

12-Step Approach:

Counseling is based around the 12-step model and the disease of addiction which addresses how our bodies and brains respond to addictive chemicals. Clients are taught new coping skills to prepare them for dealing with emotions, relapse-prevention and addictive behaviors. The Twelve Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous has been a proven benefit to those seeking recovery from addictions, in part because of the focus on looking at the reality of one's life and determining how things could be improved if certain efforts are made. The additional benefit of 12-step programs is the support of other individuals also seeking recovery. Attendance of 12-step meetings is an important part of treatment.

Level of Care:

Intensive Outpatient:

Intensive Outpatient programs are for those who want or need a very structured treatment program but who also wish to live at home and continue with certain responsibilities (such as work or school). This program includes a three-hour per day program involving groups, lectures, individual sessions, family care and family sessions. This Intensive Outpatient program involves treatment five days per week.

Outpatient:

Outpatient programs are for those seeking mental rehab or drug rehab, but who also stay at home every night. This program includes a combination of one-two hour groups, individual sessions and family sessions. Group sessions typically will occur once per week. Individual sessions typically occur one-two times per month. Family sessions are scheduled as needed.

Inpatient:

Clients at this level of care live at the Bryan Independence Center. With programming from 9 am-9 pm, treatment includes groups, lectures, discussions, videos, individual sessions, family sessions, family care, and recreational activities. Length of stay varies, averaging 23 days. Includes initial physician visit, then physician visits as needed.

Treatment:

Substance Abuse:

Substance abuse is when a person depends on an addictive substance, such as alcohol or drugs, to function. Signs of substance abuse include not being able to function without it (i.e. trying to stop using it and not being able to control yourself, and/or experiencing withdrawal symptoms); lying about needing it (i.e. telling friends or family members you can "stop anytime" when that isn't true); going to extreme measures to get it (i.e. lying or stealing to get it, like taking prescription drugs out of a family member's medicine cabinet because you aren't getting yours anymore); and more. Depending on the substance, drug and alcohol abuse can also alter the brain's ability to focus and form normal thoughts, making it even hard to overcome addiction. Help is needed to recover from substance abuse. This can include going to inpatient or outpatient rehab facilities; attending 12-step meetings like Alcoholics Anonymous or Narcotics Anonymous; getting therapy; and more.

Alcohol Abuse:

There are many warning signs for alcoholism. For someone who is abusing alcohol, excessive drinking affects their work, school and home life. Other symptoms of alcohol abuse include: memory loss or blacking out, engaging in risky behavior (like driving a car), and hurting yourself or someone else while drunk. Alcohol abuse can progress to alcoholism. An alcoholic can’t control when or how much they drink. For an alcoholic, the goal of treatment is abstinence. Treatment and recovery from alcoholism usually involves therapy or counseling, as well as 12 step programs and AA meetings.

Dual Diagnosis:

They recognize that individuals suffering from substance use problems may also suffer from other mental illnesses, which requires proper assessment, diagnosis and treatment. They focus on integrated treatment of the whole person and offer programming to help people who need both substance use and mental health care. Their interdisciplinary team includes counselors, nurses, a teacher, spiritual counselor, mental health technicians, psychiatrists and mental health practitioners.

Opioid Addiction:

Opiate addiction treatment focuses on helping individuals who want to overcome addiction to opiate drugs. These drugs include illicit substances like heroin, as well as prescription opioids like hydrocodone and oxycodone (prescription names include Vicodin and OxyContin). This kind of treatment deals with everything from the shame of addiction to strategies for maintaining sobriety. For example, many people start taking prescription opioids for a legitimate medical reason (such as recovery from surgery), and then become addicted. Once they can't get the prescription drug anymore (i.e. the surgery is over and there's no more medical reason for continued prescriptions), these people often turn to heroin. There can be a lot of shame and self-judgment involved in the unexpected decline of one's health and life path that accompanies something like heroin addiction. In individual and group therapy, such issues are explored, with the goal of healing. Some opiate addiction programs also address co-occurring mental health issues if those are present (i.e. a person has both clinical depression and struggles with opioid substance abuse). Treatment for opioid addiction can involve seeking out individual counseling, or going to a rehab center for full-time rehabilitation.

Anger:

Aggression, anger or violent behavior should not be ignored. Extreme feelings of anger can lead to distress, dysfunction and the inability to cope with one's emotions in a healthy way. A person with anger issues might have a sudden or uncontrollable outburst. Individuals with anger problems might also hold grudges, have trouble taking criticism, or feel like they have to “win” every argument. For someone struggling with addiction, anger issues could cause or worsen their substance abuse problem. Also, a person who is abusing drugs or alcohol could experience more intense feelings of anger.

Grief:

Following the death of a loved one, it is normal to feel sad or experience grief. Typically, someone who is grieving will go through five stages: denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance. While grief is a natural response to loss, using alcohol or drugs to deal with one’s feelings is not a healthy way to cope. Using drugs and alcohol to manage or soothe feelings of grief could lead to substance abuse or addiction. Unresolved grief — and the depression that follows — could leave someone more vulnerable to developing a substance abuse problem.

Techniques:

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy:

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a common therapy technique. This type of therapy focuses on the relationship between a person's thoughts, feelings and behaviors. For example, if you know that when you have the thought, "I'm worthless," you want to drink or do drugs, you can then make a new choice in the future when you have that thought (like calling a friend or going for a walk instead). Awareness is critical in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, the ultimate goal of which is to help patients develop healthy responses to their thoughts and feelings. CBT has been proven very helpful for people struggling with alcohol and drug addiction, as well other mental health issues, like eating disorders. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy helps a person become more self-aware and build up their ability to cope with problems in healthier ways. Many therapists, counselors, psychologists, and social workers use Cognitive Behavioral Therapy techniques when working with their patients.

Nutrition Therapy:

In treating addiction and other mental health issues, many benefit from a holistic approach, which can include nutritional therapy. Also known as medical nutritional therapy (MNT), nutritional therapy refers to changing one's diet to treat physical or emotional health issues. Nutritional therapy seeks to treat the body as a whole and promote physical, emotional and mental wellbeing. A nutritional therapist — which could refer to a professsional nutritionist or a registered dietitian — helps a person alleviate their health concerns through maintaining a healthy, balanced diet. A nutritional therapist makes diet and lifestyle recommendations, but they do not diagnose medical conditions or treat mental health issues directly. Many rehab facilities and addiction recovery centers offer some form of nutritional therapy.

Amenities:

Private Setting
Residential Setting
Day School Available
Recreation Room

Accreditations:

JCAHO
Last Updated: 05/31/2018