Intake:

Programs for Women
Programs for Men
LGBTQ Programs
Adult Programs
Options for Adolescents
Postpartum Programs
HIV/AIDS Programs
Military Programs
Bilingual Therapists

Financials:

Payment Assistance
Private Insurance
Medicaid
State Financial Aid
Self-pay Options

Modality:

Family Counseling:

Family Counseling can be for both the addict and his/her family, or may be solely for family members (without the addict present). Many support groups for family members of addicts see addiction as a family illness, not just the problem of one member of the family (the addict). Numerous research studies also demonstrate that recovery is far more successful and sustainable when loved ones -- especially family members -- participate in rehab and/or substance abuse treatment. Family support groups are also helpful since family members relating with an addict often need support themselves; it's a very stressful thing to deal with. Family support groups allow all members of the family to receive the benefits of treatment, and can include training on how to communicate effectively, establish healthy boundaries, and get support around the stress and trauma of addiction.

Group Counseling:

Group Counseling is therapy that includes two or more people and is led by a mental health professional (usually a therapist or a counselor). Group therapy can help participants improve their social skills, talk about their problems with others, and work on their mental health issues. In group therapy, members can provide support for one another in the group. They can also offer advice on how a person in the group can cope with or deal with their problems. Some group therapy sessions focus on helping people suffering from alcoholism or drug addiction. Through group therapy, participants often feel less alone because they know that others struggle with the same issues.

Additional Services:

Medically Assisted Detox:

Alcohol and drug abuse has a harmful effect on the body, especially when, over time, a person has developed a physical dependence on drugs or alcohol. When someone is addicted to drugs or alcohol, the process of removing these harmful substances from the body is called detoxing. There are serious dangers to detoxing without the help of a medical professional. Detoxing in an unsafe way (for example, stopping suddenly and completely, i.e. cold turkey) can even be deadly. Medically assisted detox is done by a licensed medical professional, who monitors vital signs and keeps you safe while you're detoxing. It's very important for someone with a substance abuse problem to seek help before trying to detox on their own.

Buprenorphine Detox:

Buprenorphine (brand name Subutex, among others) is an opioid medication used to treat opioid addiction. Buprenorphine can prevent or significantly reduce withdrawal symptoms, making it easier to get and stay off opioids. Sometimes used alongside naloxone, dosage depends on the severity of each case. Many people stay on buprenorphine long-term, although some gradually reduce the dosage to come off it.

Naltrexone:

Naltrexone is an FDA-approved medication used to treat opioid and alcohol addiction. Naltrexone helps reduce cravings and prevent relapse, making recovery easier. It comes either in pill form (ReVia, Depade), taken once a day; or in an injectable form (Vivitrol), administered monthly. Patients must not have any illegal opioids or opioid medication in their system for at least 7-10 days before starting naltrexone (this includes methadone, so if you’re switching from methadone to naltrexone, you must wait until your system is clear).

Level of Care:

Intensive Outpatient:

For someone struggling with alcohol or drug addiction, it's important to find the right treatment program. Intensive Outpatient Programs are for people who want or need to live at home while getting treatment for substance abuse. For example, some people need to stay at home because they have work, school or family responsibilities (like small children). Intensive Outpatient Programs provide a structured treatment option for recovering addicts and individuals dealing with mental health issues. These programs vary in length and intensity. The goal of an Intensive Outpatient Program is to offer nearly the same level of support, therapy, and care as an inpatient rehab program.

Outpatient:

An outpatient program is a treatment program for someone struggling with alcoholism, drug addiction or a serious mental health issue, where patients live at home while going through the program. A person enrolled in a residential or inpatient program might transition into an outpatient program. An outpatient program can last several weeks or months, depending on the treatment center or facility. Someone in an outpatient program will usually attend group therapy or individual therapy sessions multiple times a week, while still living at home. An outpatient program is also referred to as aftercare. It's important to make a plan for maintaining sobriety and continuing therapy while in recovery. A counselor or therapist can work with patients in an outpatient program to make sure they are getting the support they need.

Treatment:

Substance Abuse:

Substance abuse is when a person depends on an addictive substance, such as alcohol or drugs, to function. Signs of substance abuse include not being able to function without it (i.e. trying to stop using it and not being able to control yourself, and/or experiencing withdrawal symptoms); lying about needing it (i.e. telling friends or family members you can "stop anytime" when that isn't true); going to extreme measures to get it (i.e. lying or stealing to get it, like taking prescription drugs out of a family member's medicine cabinet because you aren't getting yours anymore); and more. Depending on the substance, drug and alcohol abuse can also alter the brain's ability to focus and form normal thoughts, making it even hard to overcome addiction. Help is needed to recover from substance abuse. This can include going to inpatient or outpatient rehab facilities; attending 12-step meetings like Alcoholics Anonymous or Narcotics Anonymous; getting therapy; and more.

Alcohol Abuse:

There are many warning signs for alcoholism. For someone who is abusing alcohol, excessive drinking affects their work, school and home life. Other symptoms of alcohol abuse include: memory loss or blacking out, engaging in risky behavior (like driving a car), and hurting yourself or someone else while drunk. Alcohol abuse can progress to alcoholism. An alcoholic can’t control when or how much they drink. For an alcoholic, the goal of treatment is abstinence. Treatment and recovery from alcoholism usually involves therapy or counseling, as well as 12 step programs and AA meetings.

Dual Diagnosis:

Dual diagnosis refers to the diagnosis given to a person or patient who struggles with addiction and has also been diagnosed with a mental or emotional illness. To treat someone with a dual diagnosis, rehab centers and other mental health facilities aim to provide comprehensive treatment for both the substance abuse and mental illness. At these facilities, counselors and therapists work with dual-diagnosis patients to help them manage their mental health problems and overcome addiction at the same time. Common co-occurring substance abuse and mental illnesses can include drug addiction or alcoholism alongside clinical depression, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder, and more. In some cases, a mental health illness can lead to an addiction issue, or vice versa: an addiction issue can create a mental health issue. It's important to treat both at the same time whenever possible.

Opioid Addiction:

Opiate addiction treatment focuses on helping individuals who want to overcome addiction to opiate drugs. These drugs include illicit substances like heroin, as well as prescription opioids like hydrocodone and oxycodone (prescription names include Vicodin and OxyContin). This kind of treatment deals with everything from the shame of addiction to strategies for maintaining sobriety. For example, many people start taking prescription opioids for a legitimate medical reason (such as recovery from surgery), and then become addicted. Once they can't get the prescription drug anymore (i.e. the surgery is over and there's no more medical reason for continued prescriptions), these people often turn to heroin. There can be a lot of shame and self-judgment involved in the unexpected decline of one's health and life path that accompanies something like heroin addiction. In individual and group therapy, such issues are explored, with the goal of healing. Some opiate addiction programs also address co-occurring mental health issues if those are present (i.e. a person has both clinical depression and struggles with opioid substance abuse). Treatment for opioid addiction can involve seeking out individual counseling, or going to a rehab center for full-time rehabilitation.

Techniques:

Trauma Therapy:

Trauma can be one of the main triggers and causes for addiction. Trauma therapy helps someone deal with a traumatic incident or event from their past. Trauma can stem from childhood sexual abuse; domestic violence; teenage or adult sexual assault; or losing one or both parents at a young age. There are other types of trauma as well, such as having a parent with a mental illness. These traumatic experiences often affect a person's life in the present. For instance, someone who was a victim of childhood sexual abuse often feels intense shame, fear, depression or guilt. Those who have experienced trauma often abuse drugs or alcohol as a way to cope with what happened to them in the past. The goal of trauma therapy is to help a patient process their trauma and move on, with the aid of a trained and compassionate mental health professional.

Contact:

Addiction Care Interventions - Chemical Dependency Outpatient Services
Last Updated: 05/26/2019