Intake:

Treatment Duration: 30-90 days
Beds Available: 36
Programs for Women
Programs for Men
LGBTQ Programs
Adult Programs
Young Adult Programs
HIV/AIDS Programs
Smoking Permitted

Financials:

Monthly Fee: $29,000.00
Private Insurance
Self-pay Options

Modality:

Family Counseling:

Family Program is key in helping the whole family heal and supports the loved one during and after treatment. This program helps educate families about substance use disorders and the underlying issues that their loved one is addressing. It also helps family members work on issues that affect them and their relationship with their family member. The program teaches people how to support and cope with an addicted family member, how to better communicate and establish boundaries, and how to connect with community support systems to find other options for self-care. We understand that many people who abuse substances refuse treatment, though family members and concerned significant others are highly motivated to get their loved one the help they need. When a person is resistant to seek help for their addiction, Sunspire Health offers Community Reinforcement Approach and Family Training (CRAFT). During a CRAFT therapy session, the person suffering with addiction is usually not present. Instead, this therapy focuses on educating family members about the nature of addiction and equipping them with communication techniques that discourage their loved ones from using and encourage them to seek help.

Individual Counseling:

In individual Counseling, a client meets one-on-one with a trained therapist or counselor. This kind of psychotherapy and focused attention is a crucial part of treating substance abuse and helping individuals overcome alcohol and drug addiction. Therapy can be instrumental in uncovering the root causes of addiction, such as challenges and struggles a patient has faced in their family, social, and work/school lives. Once these root causes (which often involve past trauma) are identified and worked through, substance abuse is much easier to overcome and sobriety to be reached. Different therapists use different therapeutic modalities, such as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, which has been shown to be effective in stopping addiction while also providing tools for maintaining sobriety.

Group Counseling:

Group Counseling is therapy that includes two or more people and is led by a mental health professional (usually a therapist or a counselor). Group therapy can help participants improve their social skills, talk about their problems with others, and work on their mental health issues. In group therapy, members can provide support for one another in the group. They can also offer advice on how a person in the group can cope with or deal with their problems. Some group therapy sessions focus on helping people suffering from alcoholism or drug addiction. Through group therapy, participants often feel less alone because they know that others struggle with the same issues.

Additional Services:

Medically Assisted Detox:

For many who enter addiction treatment, detox is the first step in the recovery process. Medical detox is the phase in which individuals clear all traces of the addictive substance from their body while the physical symptoms of withdrawal are managed by medical professionals. At Sunspire Health, our Board Certified medical professionals are available 24/7 to supervise patient detox. Not only does this ensure a healthy and safe withdrawal, but it also leads to higher chances of recovery from treatment. The medical detox process begins immediately after the patient arrives at the detox center and goes through intake. The length of the detox process depends on the patient's medical history, the type of substance they used and how long they used the substance. Withdrawal symptoms can last a few days or even a couple of weeks. In most cases, medical detox will last between 7 to 14 days. While medical detox may cleanse a person's body of the addictive substance, it does not treat the underlying behavioral causes of addiction or treat the effects. Medical detox must be followed by therapy and other forms of rehabilitation. A residential treatment program, which often follows detox, may take between 30 and 90 days

Medication-Assisted Treatment:

Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT) is the use of medications along with counseling and therapy to treat substance abuse. MAT is mainly used to treat opioid addictions (i.e. heroin and/or prescription drugs like OxyContin or Vicodin). Medications like buprenorphine are used in MAT to help normalize brain chemistry, block the effects of alcohol and/or opioids, relieve cravings, and stabilize body functions, making sobriety easier to maintain. All medications used are approved by the FDA, and every MAT program is tailored to the patient’s specific needs.

24-Hour Clinical Care:

At certain points in the recovery process, it's important to have support available 24/7. 24-hour clinical care offers a safe environment in which to recover from drug or alcohol addiction in peace, knowing medical detox and other treatment will happen with professionals on hand.

Aftercare Support:

When someone completes a drug or alcohol program, this does not mean that their treatment is over. It is extremely important for anyone recovering from alcoholism or drug addiction to have support while maintaining sobriety. Aftercare support involves making a plan for recovery and sobriety. This can include attending AA or NA meetings, moving to a halfway house or sober living home, finding a therapist or counselor who specializes in addiction, or participating in group therapy or family therapy while living at home. Many rehab facilities and mental health treatment centers offer some type of aftercare support for patients. A counselor or therapist can also work with patients to come up with an aftercare plan that helps them stay sober and live a happy, healthy life in recovery.

Sober Living Homes:

Sober Living Houses (SLHs), aka sober homes or halfway houses, are safe, substance-free, supportive living facilities for those recovering from substance abuse. Ideal for those who've just been through inpatient or outpatient treatment, SLHs are supervised environments with rules that support sobriety, such as curfews, shared chores, and therapeutic meetings. Residents are also often trained on life skills and coping skills to make it easier to transition into society. SLHs also provide a strong sense of community that can lead to the kind of deep and lasting connections with other sober individuals that supports a new, healthy lifestyle.

Treatment Approach:

Holistic Approach:

A holistic approach to treatment involves helping someone improve their physical, mental and emotional health. Holistic therapy focuses on the body, mind and soul to achieve optimal health and wellness. In treating addiction and substance abuse, holistic therapy practices are often used alongside more traditional treatment methods, such as psychotherapy, counseling or medication. Many drug and alcohol rehab centers offer some form of holistic therapy, such as yoga, nutrition therapy, meditation, acupuncture, massage, fitness classes, and art therapy. A counselor or a therapist might also recommend holistic therapy for patients struggling with drug and alcohol addiction. Additionally, a counselor might use a holistic approach when treating a patient. A holistic approach could also be beneficial in treating other mental health issues, like depression, anxiety, ADHD, bipolar disorder, etc. Holistic therapy is about more than overcoming addiction and maintaining sobriety: it's about treating the person as a whole — mind, body and spirit.

SMART Recovery:

SMART (Self-Management & Recovery Training) is a method addiction recovery, often seen as an “alternative” to 12-step programs. It emphasizes 4 core areas: Building Motivation, Coping with Urges, Problem Solving, and Lifestyle Balance. The SMART approach views substance use as a dysfunctional habit (not a disease), emphasizes the latest scientific research on addiction, and believes each individual finds his/her own path to recovery. Notably, relapses are seen as a normal part of the change cycle and good learning experiences if handled properly. SMART can be put to use anywhere (any rehab facility or group).

Individualized Approach:

When it comes to overcoming alcohol or drug addiction, there is no one-size-fits-all treatment that works for everyone. Instead of following a standard treatment plan, many mental health professionals offer an individual, personalized approach to treating substance abuse. Individualized treatment takes into account a person's unique physical, mental and emotional health and the specific ways addiction affects their life. An individualized treatment program also acknowledges that each patient has different needs. Therapists and counselors who offer individualized treatment seek to treat all aspects of a person's addiction, including helping them improve their physical, emotional and spiritual wellbeing.

12-Step Approach:

A 12-step program is a treatment approach originally based on Alcoholics Anonymous (AA). The 12-step model is used in many drug and alcohol addiction recovery programs. Licensed therapists and counselors also employ 12-step methods when treating individuals who are struggling with substance abuse. The first stage of a 12-step program involves admitting that you are powerless over your addiction and believing in a higher power that can help you. Other steps involve making amends to those you have hurt in the past, connecting with a higher power through prayer and meditation, and helping others in their recovery from addiction. The 12-step model is used for Narcotics Anonymous (NA), Gamblers Anonymous (GA), and Sex and Love Addicts Anonymous (SLAA), among others. The 12-step model can be an effective way to help someone dealing with addiction, which is why it is used in a large number of treatment centers, as well as by therapists, counselors and mental health professionals.

Level of Care:

Partial Hospitalization Program:

A partial hospitalization program (PHP) is a treatment program for patients who do not need 24-hour care. These programs usually help individuals with mental illnesses, but they can also help those struggling with substance abuse issues. In a PHP program, patients typically have structured treatment programs, like group or individual therapy, and meet 3-5 days a week for 6 hours or less. In some PHP programs, patients sleep on site. PHP programs can last up to 6 months and some offer transportation and meals. A PHP program can be a bridge between inpatient and outpatient treatment. A counselor working with patients in a PHP program can help them return to normal life, while still providing support during this transition.

Intensive Outpatient:

Sunspire Health's Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP) can be the next level of care after a client completes residential treatment or a Partial Hospitalization Program (PHP). In some locations, clients can start treatment at the IOP level of care. In IOP, clients attend rehabilitation sessions at a facility 3-5 times a week for 3-4 hours per session while living at home. Individuals are able to regularly see and communicate with their friends and family during this time, which provides additional support during recovery. IOP continues to address the physical and psychological causes and effects of addiction with integrated treatment methods that combine evidence-based, adventure and holistic therapies. During IOP, a client will attend individual therapy sessions, family therapy sessions and support group sessions with others on the path to recovery. Medical professionals at an IOP center may administer medication, depending on their assessment of the individual's needs. Those in treatment at one of our IOPs are strongly urged to continue to receive additional support by attending a community based self-help program such as 12-Step meetings, this serves as an additional support system in place for when triggers and stressors from outside influences could challenge their recent sobriety.

Outpatient:

An outpatient program is a treatment program for someone struggling with alcoholism, drug addiction or a serious mental health issue, where patients live at home while going through the program. A person enrolled in a residential or inpatient program might transition into an outpatient program. An outpatient program can last several weeks or months, depending on the treatment center or facility. Someone in an outpatient program will usually attend group therapy or individual therapy sessions multiple times a week, while still living at home. An outpatient program is also referred to as aftercare. It's important to make a plan for maintaining sobriety and continuing therapy while in recovery. A counselor or therapist can work with patients in an outpatient program to make sure they are getting the support they need.

Inpatient:

Residential treatment is highly recommended for those suffering with substance use and co-occurring mental health disorders who are ready to begin recovering from addiction or addictive behaviors. Our residential treatment programs offer clients a safe, homelike environment to heal where they can reside throughout the duration of their addiction treatment program, with the benefit of 24/7 access to medical professionals and addiction specialists. Also known as an inpatient treatment program, a residential program addresses the physical and psychological causes and effects of substance use and co-occurring mental health disorders with treatment methods that integrate evidence-based clinical interventions, use of evidence-based medications (if required and prescribed by the attending physician), and holistic therapies. Treatment length depends on each individual case, and as directed by the center's clinical and medical team, and typically can range from 30 to 90 days.

Treatment:

Mental Health and Substance Abuse:

A combined mental health and substance abuse treatment center is designed to treat individuals with both mental health and substance abuse issues. Therapists and staff at these kinds of centers help patients who struggle with both a drug and alcohol addiction, along with a mental health problem like clinical depression, anxiety disorders, Bipolar Disorder, and more. They're trained to help patients identify the root causes of their addiction and mental health issues, and to help manage both. Many addiction counselors specialize in treating individuals with mental health problems, and are well-equipped to deliver high-quality treatment to those struggling from addiction alongside a mental health issue.

Alcohol Abuse:

There are many warning signs for alcoholism. For someone who is abusing alcohol, excessive drinking affects their work, school and home life. Other symptoms of alcohol abuse include: memory loss or blacking out, engaging in risky behavior (like driving a car), and hurting yourself or someone else while drunk. Alcohol abuse can progress to alcoholism. An alcoholic can’t control when or how much they drink. For an alcoholic, the goal of treatment is abstinence. Treatment and recovery from alcoholism usually involves therapy or counseling, as well as 12 step programs and AA meetings.

Dual Diagnosis:

Dual diagnosis refers to the diagnosis given to a person or patient who struggles with addiction and has also been diagnosed with a mental or emotional illness. To treat someone with a dual diagnosis, rehab centers and other mental health facilities aim to provide comprehensive treatment for both the substance abuse and mental illness. At these facilities, counselors and therapists work with dual-diagnosis patients to help them manage their mental health problems and overcome addiction at the same time. Common co-occurring substance abuse and mental illnesses can include drug addiction or alcoholism alongside clinical depression, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder, and more. In some cases, a mental health illness can lead to an addiction issue, or vice versa: an addiction issue can create a mental health issue. It's important to treat both at the same time whenever possible.

Opioid Addiction:

Opiate addiction treatment focuses on helping individuals who want to overcome addiction to opiate drugs. These drugs include illicit substances like heroin, as well as prescription opioids like hydrocodone and oxycodone (prescription names include Vicodin and OxyContin). This kind of treatment deals with everything from the shame of addiction to strategies for maintaining sobriety. For example, many people start taking prescription opioids for a legitimate medical reason (such as recovery from surgery), and then become addicted. Once they can't get the prescription drug anymore (i.e. the surgery is over and there's no more medical reason for continued prescriptions), these people often turn to heroin. There can be a lot of shame and self-judgment involved in the unexpected decline of one's health and life path that accompanies something like heroin addiction. In individual and group therapy, such issues are explored, with the goal of healing. Some opiate addiction programs also address co-occurring mental health issues if those are present (i.e. a person has both clinical depression and struggles with opioid substance abuse). Treatment for opioid addiction can involve seeking out individual counseling, or going to a rehab center for full-time rehabilitation.

Anger:

Aggression, anger or violent behavior should not be ignored. Extreme feelings of anger can lead to distress, dysfunction and the inability to cope with one's emotions in a healthy way. A person with anger issues might have a sudden or uncontrollable outburst. Individuals with anger problems might also hold grudges, have trouble taking criticism, or feel like they have to “win” every argument. For someone struggling with addiction, anger issues could cause or worsen their substance abuse problem. Also, a person who is abusing drugs or alcohol could experience more intense feelings of anger.

Anxiety:

An anxiety disorder is the diagnosis for someone who experiences frequent or obsessive anxiety that doesn't go away. Signs of an anxiety disorder include excessive worrying; trouble concentrating; fear of making the wrong decision; and constantly feeling restless or inability to relax. Physical symptoms of an anxiety disorder include fatigue, poor sleep patterns, nervousness, nausea, sweating, and tense muscles. Anxiety disorders are one of the most common mental health issues that occur alongside substance abuse. Many addiction and substance abuse counselors are trained to help patients with a co-occurring anxiety disorder.

Bipolar:

Bipolar Disorder is a mental illness that generates unusual and extreme changes in a person's mood, energy levels and the ability to accomplish daily tasks and think clearly. A person with Bipolar Disorder can experience frequent highs (often referred to as mania or manic episodes) and lows (often referred to as depression or depressive episodes). Someone with Bipolar Disorder might "self-medicate" by using drugs and alcohol to deal with their mental or emotional issues. Substance abuse is more common with Bipolar Disorder than with any other mental health diagnosis. Suicide is a serious risk concern for an individual with Bipolar Disorder.

Depression:

Depression is a serious mood disorder. Signs and symptoms of depression include: fatigue, trouble sleeping, changes in appetite, lack of interest in activities a person used to enjoy, irritability, and suicidal thoughts. A depressed person might feel sad, anxious, or hopeless. Typically, symptoms must persist for at least two weeks before someone is diagnosed with clinical depression. Depression can affect people of all ages, ethnicities and socioeconomic backgrounds. An estimated 30% of people with substance abuse problems suffer from depression.

PTSD and Trauma:

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a mental health disorder that someone can develop after experiencing a traumatic incident, such as a shooting, a natural disaster, a car accident, or sexual assault (i.e. rape or child sexual abuse). Symptoms of PTSD include reliving the event in one's mind; nightmares; avoiding situations that might trigger memories of the event; negative beliefs and feelings; and feeling jittery, angry or irritable. The main types of treatment for PTSD are psychotherapy and medication. Someone suffering from PTSD may experience depression, anxiety and substance abuse problems.

Techniques:

Fitness Therapy:

Fitness therapy blends exercise with psychotherapy for a fun, inspiring, and effective way of treating addiction and other issues. By incorporating movement into counseling sessions, clients become more empowered, motivated, and goal-oriented, all while strengthening their bodies and becoming more flexible. Fitness Therapy is usually used to complement a course of treatment (inpatient or outpatient) to make it even more successful. Increasing the connection between a patient’s mind and body helps both with healing as well as in creating new, healthy habits.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy:

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a common therapy technique. This type of therapy focuses on the relationship between a person's thoughts, feelings and behaviors. For example, if you know that when you have the thought, "I'm worthless," you want to drink or do drugs, you can then make a new choice in the future when you have that thought (like calling a friend or going for a walk instead). Awareness is critical in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, the ultimate goal of which is to help patients develop healthy responses to their thoughts and feelings. CBT has been proven very helpful for people struggling with alcohol and drug addiction, as well other mental health issues, like eating disorders. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy helps a person become more self-aware and build up their ability to cope with problems in healthier ways. Many therapists, counselors, psychologists, and social workers use Cognitive Behavioral Therapy techniques when working with their patients.

Dialectical Behavior Therapy:

Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) is type of therapy that helps someone understand the relationship between their thoughts, feelings and actions. Once a person understands this relationship, they can work on changing their behaviors and dealing with their problems in healthier ways. Dialectical Behavior Therapy has been proven clinically effective for people struggling with out-of-control emotions and some mental illnesses, like Borderline Personality Disorder. This type of therapy can also be helpful for individuals dealing with self-harm, such as self-mutilation (cutting) or having suicidal thoughts or urges. Dialectical Behavior Therapy often builds on the techniques and tools a patient learned in Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT), one of the most common types of therapy.

Trauma Therapy:

Trauma can be one of the main triggers and causes for addiction. Trauma therapy helps someone deal with a traumatic incident or event from their past. Trauma can stem from childhood sexual abuse; domestic violence; teenage or adult sexual assault; or losing one or both parents at a young age. There are other types of trauma as well, such as having a parent with a mental illness. These traumatic experiences often affect a person's life in the present. For instance, someone who was a victim of childhood sexual abuse often feels intense shame, fear, depression or guilt. Those who have experienced trauma often abuse drugs or alcohol as a way to cope with what happened to them in the past. The goal of trauma therapy is to help a patient process their trauma and move on, with the aid of a trained and compassionate mental health professional.

Equine Therapy:

Equine therapy is a type of therapy that involves activities with horses. Equine therapy is also called equine-assisted therapy (EAT). Equine therapy does not necessarily mean riding horses, but can involve other activities such as feeding, grooming, haltering and leading horses. A mental health professional (like a therapist) is usually present during equine therapy, often along with a horse trainer. There are multiple mental health treatment facilities and rehab centers that offer equine therapy. By learning how to communicate with and lead horses, patients can learn social skills, work on trust and boundaries, and improve their confidence. Equine therapy is an experiential therapy technique, which takes a hands-on approach to helping a person deal with their thoughts, feelings and behaviors.

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing:

The term EDMR refers to Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing. EDMR is a type of therapy originally developed to process trauma, and it can help someone to quickly and dramatically reduce the stress associated with a traumatic event. During an EDMR session, a patient is prompted by a therapist to undergo rapid back-and-forth eye movements (i.e. watching someone's finger go back and forth quickly in front of your face). This eye movement is similar to the REM sleep cycle, and helps reprocess memory in the brain (REM sleep is the last stage of the sleep cycle in which dreams often occur). EDMR is commonly used to treat Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in adults, and has been proven to be very effective. It can also be used to help children and adolescents dealing with traumatic events (like school shootings or child abuse). The goal of EDMR is to help the brain reprocess a memory, as a way to heal these painful or traumatic memories. Following an EDMR session, a patient might feel calmer, more relaxed and more stable.

Experiential Therapy:

Experiential therapy is different from traditional 'talk' therapy. In experiential therapy, a person works through issues by participating in real-life, hands-on experiences. For example, someone struggling with alcoholism or drug addiction might participate in outdoor activities, which is sometimes called wilderness therapy. Experiential therapy can also include creative activities (like music or making art), or having patients role-play a situation or problem by "acting it out" and using props. Many rehab facilities and mental health treatment centers offer some type of experiential therapy, such as: wilderness therapy, equine therapy (working with horses), creative arts therapy, and adventure therapy. Experiential therapy can help someone process trauma, heal from painful memories and experiences, and build new coping and social skills. This type of therapy can also boost a person's self-esteem and prepare them for success in their home life, relationships, social life and careers following treatment.

Life Skills:

Overcoming addiction is not easy. Someone struggling with alcohol or drug addiction faces many challenges in their personal and professional lives, and needs life skills to navigate them. Life skills simply means the skills one needs in life to function sucessfully in the world. A recovering addict might need help developing some of these life skills, like getting a job, time management, money management and having good communication skills. Along with providing therapy and support, many mental health professionals, such as therapists, counselors, and social workers, help patients improve their life skills. Some rehab centers offer life skills classes, which help patients job hunt, find a place to live, and learn better social skills, without needing drugs or alcohol to cope.

Nutrition Therapy:

In treating addiction and other mental health issues, many benefit from a holistic approach, which can include nutritional therapy. Also known as medical nutritional therapy (MNT), nutritional therapy refers to changing one's diet to treat physical or emotional health issues. Nutritional therapy seeks to treat the body as a whole and promote physical, emotional and mental wellbeing. A nutritional therapist — which could refer to a professsional nutritionist or a registered dietitian — helps a person alleviate their health concerns through maintaining a healthy, balanced diet. A nutritional therapist makes diet and lifestyle recommendations, but they do not diagnose medical conditions or treat mental health issues directly. Many rehab facilities and addiction recovery centers offer some form of nutritional therapy.

Creative Arts Therapy:

We tend to think of therapy as 'talk' therapy, but this is not the only type of therapy. Creative arts therapy can help someone dealing with substance abuse or mental health issues in a different way. Creative arts therapy includes music, poetry/writing, painting, sculpting, dance, theater, sandplay, and other creative activities. This type of therapy helps someone express emotions, thoughts and experiences that might be hard to talk about. Creative arts therapy can be beneficial for children, teenagers and adults struggling with mental health problems, alcoholism and drug addiction. This form of therapy is not meant to replace 'talk' therapy or other types of treatment. However, creative arts therapy provides an important outlet for patients while in recovery.

Animal Therapy:

Animal therapy can be very healing and help with a person's recovery process. Animal therapy — also called pet therapy or animal-assisted therapy — involves interacting with dogs or other animals in a therapeutic setting. Animals can provide love, support and comfort for individuals who are in treatment for substance abuse or other mental health issues. By bonding with an animal, patients who participate in animal therapy can develop better social skills and receive unconditional love in a safe, healing environment. Pet therapy can also help someone feel less lonely and anxious while undergoing treatment for a variety of medical conditions, including substance abuse and mental health disorders.

Yoga:

Yoga is a holistic practice that can improve your physical, mental and emotional health. Yoga involves breathing exercises, physical movement, and meditation. Yoga can help you feel calmer, less stressed and more relaxed. An addict often turns to drugs or alcohol as an unhealthy way to cope with their problems. Yoga can be a healthy way to manage emotions and improve your mood. You do not need to be "in shape" to do yoga. People of all ages and body types can do some yoga poses, and nearly everyone can benefit from the physical effects of yoga, which include flexibility and resilience. Many rehab centers and mental health treatment facilities offer yoga classes. Some recovering addicts find yoga to be very beneficial in overcoming their addiction, as well as improving both their physical and mental health. Yoga is not meant to be a substitute for traditional therapy, counseling, or a rehabilitation program.

Amenities:

Luxury Setting
Beach Setting
Ocean Views
Private Rooms
Acupuncture
Gym
Outdoor Activities
Massage
Meditation
Pool Available
Recreation Room
Spa Available

Accreditations:

JCAHO: 585545
Last Updated: 05/31/2018